ICD-10 Diagnosis Code A18.6

Tuberculosis of (inner) (middle) ear

Diagnosis Code A18.6

ICD-10: A18.6
Short Description: Tuberculosis of (inner) (middle) ear
Long Description: Tuberculosis of (inner) (middle) ear
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code A18.6

Valid for Submission
The code A18.6 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Tuberculosis (A15-A19)
      • Tuberculosis of other organs (A18)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code A18.6 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)

  • OTHER EAR, NOSE, MOUTH AND THROAT DIAGNOSES WITH MCC 154
  • OTHER EAR, NOSE, MOUTH AND THROAT DIAGNOSES WITH CC 155
  • OTHER EAR, NOSE, MOUTH AND THROAT DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC 156
  • HIV WITH MAJOR RELATED CONDITION WITH MCC 974
  • HIV WITH MAJOR RELATED CONDITION WITH CC 975
  • HIV WITH MAJOR RELATED CONDITION WITHOUT CC/MCC 976

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Tuberculosis of ear
  • Tuberculous otitis media

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code A18.6 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Ear Infections

Also called: Otitis media

Ear infections are the most common reason parents bring their child to a doctor. Three out of four children will have at least one ear infection by their third birthday. Adults can also get ear infections, but they are less common.

The infection usually affects the middle ear and is called otitis media. The tubes inside the ears become clogged with fluid and mucus. This can affect hearing, because sound cannot get through all that fluid.

If your child isn't old enough to say "My ear hurts," here are a few things to look for

  • Tugging at ears
  • Crying more than usual
  • Fluid draining from the ear
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Balance difficulties
  • Hearing problems

Your health care provider will diagnose an ear infection by looking inside the ear with an instrument called an otoscope.

Often, ear infections go away on their own. Your health care provider may recommend pain relievers. Severe infections and infections in young babies may require antibiotics.

Children who get infections often may need surgery to place small tubes inside their ears. The tubes relieve pressure in the ears so that the child can hear again.

NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  • Cholesteatoma
  • Ear discharge
  • Ear examination
  • Ear infection - acute
  • Ear infection - chronic
  • Ear tube insertion
  • Earache
  • Otitis media with effusion
  • Swimmer's ear


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Tuberculosis

Also called: TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body.

TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, or talks. If you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.

Symptoms of TB in the lungs may include

  • A bad cough that lasts 3 weeks or longer
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Coughing up blood or mucus
  • Weakness or fatigue
  • Fever
  • Night sweats

Skin tests, blood tests, x-rays, and other tests can tell if you have TB. If not treated properly, TB can be deadly. You can usually cure active TB by taking several medicines for a long period of time.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Acid-fast stain
  • Coughing up blood
  • Disseminated tuberculosis
  • Meningitis - tuberculous
  • Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB) (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • PPD skin test
  • Pulmonary tuberculosis
  • Taking medicines to treat tuberculosis
  • Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis: General Information (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)


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