ICD-10 Diagnosis Code L02.631

Carbuncle of right foot

Diagnosis Code L02.631

ICD-10: L02.631
Short Description: Carbuncle of right foot
Long Description: Carbuncle of right foot
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code L02.631

Valid for Submission
The code L02.631 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00–L99)
    • Infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00-L08)
      • Cutaneous abscess, furuncle and carbuncle (L02)

Information for Patients


Skin Infections

Your skin helps protect you from germs, but sometimes it can get infected by them. Some common types of skin infections are

  • Bacterial: Cellulitis and impetigo. Staphylococcal infections can also affect the skin.
  • Viral: Shingles, warts, and herpes simplex
  • Fungal: Athlete's foot and yeast infections
  • Parasitic: Body lice, head lice, and scabies

Treatment of skin infections depends on the cause.

  • Blastomycosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Boils (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Candida infection of the skin (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carbuncle (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Donovanosis (granuloma inguinale) (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ecthyma (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Erysipelas (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Molluscum contagiosum (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Necrotizing soft tissue infection (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Staphylococcal Infections

Also called: Staph

Staph is short for Staphylococcus, a type of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including

  • Skin infections
  • Pneumonia
  • Food poisoning
  • Toxic shock syndrome
  • Blood poisoning (bacteremia)

Skin infections are the most common. They can look like pimples or boils. They may be red, swollen and painful, and sometimes have pus or other drainage. They can turn into impetigo, which turns into a crust on the skin, or cellulitis, a swollen, red area of skin that feels hot.

Anyone can get a staph skin infection. You are more likely to get one if you have a cut or scratch, or have contact with a person or surface that has staph bacteria. The best way to prevent staph is to keep hands and wounds clean. Most staph skin infections are easily treated with antibiotics or by draining the infection. Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder to treat.

  • Boils (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carbuncle (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Scalded skin syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Staph infections -- self-care at home (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxic shock syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tracheitis (Medical Encyclopedia)


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