ICD-10-CM Code O98.9

Unspecified maternal infectious and parasitic disease complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

O98.9 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of unspecified maternal infectious and parasitic disease complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:O98.9
Short Description:Unsp maternal infec/parastc disease compl preg/chldbrth
Long Description:Unspecified maternal infectious and parasitic disease complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • O98.91 - Unspecified maternal infectious and parasitic disease complicating pregnancy
  • O98.911 - Unspecified maternal infectious and parasitic disease complicating pregnancy, first trimester
  • O98.912 - Unspecified maternal infectious and parasitic disease complicating pregnancy, second trimester
  • O98.913 - Unspecified maternal infectious and parasitic disease complicating pregnancy, third trimester
  • O98.919 - Unspecified maternal infectious and parasitic disease complicating pregnancy, unspecified trimester
  • O98.92 - Unspecified maternal infectious and parasitic disease complicating childbirth
  • O98.93 - Unspecified maternal infectious and parasitic disease complicating the puerperium

Code Classification

  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00–O99)
    • Other obstetric conditions, not elsewhere classified (O94-O9A)
      • Matern infec/parastc dis classd elsw but compl preg/chldbrth (O98)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Childbirth Problems

While childbirth usually goes well, complications can happen. They can cause a risk to the mother, baby, or both. Possible complications include

  • Preterm (premature) labor, when labor starts before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy
  • Problems with the umbilical cord
  • Problems with the position of the baby, such as breech, in which the baby is going to come out feet first
  • Birth injuries

For some of these problems, the baby may need to be delivered surgically by a Cesarean section.


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Infections and Pregnancy

During pregnancy, some common infections like the common cold or a skin infection do not usually cause serious problems. But other infections can be dangerous to you, your baby, or both. Some infections may lead to preterm birth and low birth weight babies. Others can cause serious illness, birth defects, and lifelong disabilities, such as hearing loss or learning problems.

Some of the infections that can be dangerous during pregnancy include

  • Bacterial vaginosis (BV)
  • Group B strep (GBS)
  • Hepatitis
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Yeast infections
  • Zika virus

To try to prevent infections,

  • Don't eat raw or undercooked meat
  • Don't share food or drinks with other people
  • Wash your hands frequently
  • Don't empty cat litter. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis.

If you do get an infection during pregnancy, contact your health care provider about how best to protect you and your baby. Only some medicines are safe during pregnancy.


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Postpartum Care

Taking home a new baby is one of the happiest times in a woman's life. But it also presents both physical and emotional challenges.

  • Get as much rest as possible. You may find that all you can do is eat, sleep, and care for your baby. And that is perfectly okay. You will have spotting or bleeding, like a menstrual period, off and on for up to six weeks.
  • You might also have swelling in your legs and feet, feel constipated, have menstrual-like cramping. Even if you are not breastfeeding, you can have milk leaking from your nipples, and your breasts might feel full, tender, or uncomfortable.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions on how much activity, like climbing stairs or walking, you can do for the next few weeks.
  • Doctors usually recommend that you abstain from sexual intercourse for four to six weeks after birth.

In addition to physical changes, you may feel sad or have the "baby blues." If you are extremely sad or are unable to care for yourself or your baby, you might have a serious condition called postpartum depression.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health


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