ICD-10-CM Code O99.0

Anemia complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

O99.0 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of anemia complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:O99.0
Short Description:Anemia complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
Long Description:Anemia complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • O99.01 - Anemia complicating pregnancy
  • O99.011 - Anemia complicating pregnancy, first trimester
  • O99.012 - Anemia complicating pregnancy, second trimester
  • O99.013 - Anemia complicating pregnancy, third trimester
  • O99.019 - Anemia complicating pregnancy, unspecified trimester
  • O99.02 - Anemia complicating childbirth
  • O99.03 - Anemia complicating the puerperium

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code O99.0:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • anemia arising in the puerperium O90.81
  • postpartum anemia NOS O90.81

Code Classification

  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00–O99)
    • Other obstetric conditions, not elsewhere classified (O94-O9A)
      • Oth maternal diseases classd elsw but compl preg/chldbrth (O99)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Anemia

If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough iron. Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.

Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, and high rates of red blood cell destruction.

Conditions that may lead to anemia include

  • Heavy periods
  • Pregnancy
  • Ulcers
  • Colon polyps or colon cancer
  • Inherited disorders
  • A diet that does not have enough iron, folic acid or vitamin B12
  • Blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, or cancer
  • Aplastic anemia, a condition that can be inherited or acquired
  • G6PD deficiency, a metabolic disorder

Anemia can make you feel tired, cold, dizzy, and irritable. You may be short of breath or have a headache.

Your doctor will diagnose anemia with a physical exam and blood tests. Treatment depends on the kind of anemia you have.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


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Childbirth Problems

While childbirth usually goes well, complications can happen. They can cause a risk to the mother, baby, or both. Possible complications include

  • Preterm (premature) labor, when labor starts before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy
  • Problems with the umbilical cord
  • Problems with the position of the baby, such as breech, in which the baby is going to come out feet first
  • Birth injuries

For some of these problems, the baby may need to be delivered surgically by a Cesarean section.


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Health Problems in Pregnancy

Every pregnancy has some risk of problems. You may have problems because of a health condition you had before you got pregnant. You could also develop a condition during pregnancy. Other causes of problems during pregnancy can include being pregnant with more than one baby, a health problem in a previous pregnancy, substance abuse during pregnancy, or being over age 35. Any of these can affect your health, the health of your baby, or both.

If you have a chronic condition, you should talk to your health care provider about how to minimize your risk before you get pregnant. Once you are pregnant, you may need a health care team to monitor your pregnancy. Some common conditions that can complicate a pregnancy include

  • High blood pressure
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Kidney problems
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Obesity
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cancer
  • Infections

Other conditions that can make pregnancy risky can happen while you are pregnant - for example, gestational diabetes and Rh incompatibility. Good prenatal care can help detect and treat them.

Some discomforts, like nausea, back pain, and fatigue, are common during pregnancy. Sometimes it is hard to know what is normal. Call your health care provider if something is bothering or worrying you.


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