ICD-10-CM Code O36.8214

Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, first trimester, fetus 4

Version 2020 Billable Code Maternity Diagnoses Diagnoses For Females Only First Trimester (0 to 13 Weeks)

Valid for Submission

O36.8214 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, first trimester, fetus 4. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The code O36.8214 is applicable to female patients aged 12 through 55 years inclusive. It is clinically and virtually impossible to use this code on a non-female patient outside the stated age range.

ICD-10:O36.8214
Short Description:Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, first trimester, fetus 4
Long Description:Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, first trimester, fetus 4

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Maternity diagnoses - Maternity. Age range is 12–55 years inclusive (e.g., diabetes in pregnancy, antepartum pulmonary complication).
  • Diagnoses for females only - Medicare Code Editor detects inconsistencies between a patient’s sex and any diagnosis on the patient’s record, this code applies to FEMALES only .

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code O36.8214 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 817 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITH MCC
  • 818 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITH CC
  • 819 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert O36.8214 to ICD-9

  • 678.01 - Fetal hematologic-deliv (Approximate Flag)
  • 678.03 - Fetal hematologic-ante (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00–O99)
    • Maternal care related to the fetus and amniotic cavity and possible delivery problems (O30-O48)
      • Maternal care for other fetal problems (O36)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Anemia

If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough iron. Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.

Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, and high rates of red blood cell destruction.

Conditions that may lead to anemia include

  • Heavy periods
  • Pregnancy
  • Ulcers
  • Colon polyps or colon cancer
  • Inherited disorders
  • A diet that does not have enough iron, folic acid or vitamin B12
  • Blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, or cancer
  • Aplastic anemia, a condition that can be inherited or acquired
  • G6PD deficiency, a metabolic disorder

Anemia can make you feel tired, cold, dizzy, and irritable. You may be short of breath or have a headache.

Your doctor will diagnose anemia with a physical exam and blood tests. Treatment depends on the kind of anemia you have.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


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Fetal Health and Development

A normal pregnancy lasts nine months. Each three-month period of pregnancy is called a trimester. During each trimester, the fetus grows and develops. Regular medical checkups and prenatal tests are very important. They can

  • Help keep you and your baby healthy
  • Spot problems with your baby (if there are any). In some cases, health care professionals can treat the problem before your baby is born. But even when they cannot, it can still be helpful to know about the problem early on. That gives you time to learn about your baby's condition and prepare for any challenges you may face after the baby is born.
  • Prevent problems during delivery. For example, if your baby is breech (bottom first or feet first, instead of head first), you may need to have a Cesarean section to avoid complications.

Besides getting medical care, there are other things you can do to keep your baby as healthy as possible. It's important not to drink or smoke. Try to eat a healthy diet and make sure to take care of any health problems you have during pregnancy.


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Platelet Disorders

Platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small pieces of blood cells. They form in your bone marrow, a sponge-like tissue in your bones. Platelets play a major role in blood clotting. Normally, when one of your blood vessels is injured, you start to bleed. Your platelets will clot (clump together) to plug the hole in the blood vessel and stop the bleeding. You can have different problems with your platelets:

  • If your blood has a low number of platelets, it is called thrombocytopenia. This can put you at risk for mild to serious bleeding. The bleeding could be external or internal. There can be various causes. If the problem is mild, you may not need treatment. For more serious cases, you may need medicines or blood or platelet transfusions.
  • If your blood has too many platelets, you may have a higher risk of blood clots.
    • When the cause is not known, this is called thrombocythemia. It is rare. You may not need treatment if there are no signs or symptoms. In other cases, people who have it may need treatment with medicines or procedures.
    • If another disease or condition is causing the high platelet count, it is thrombocytosis. The treatment and outlook for thrombocytosis depends on what is causing it.
  • Another possible problem is that your platelets do not work as they should. For example, in von Willebrand Disease, your platelets cannot stick together or cannot attach to blood vessel walls. This can cause excessive bleeding. There are different types of in von Willebrand Disease; treatment depends on which type you have.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


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