ICD-10-CM Code N40

Benign prostatic hyperplasia

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

N40 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:N40
Short Description:Benign prostatic hyperplasia
Long Description:Benign prostatic hyperplasia

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • N40.0 - Benign prostatic hyperplasia without lower urinary tract symptoms
  • N40.1 - Benign prostatic hyperplasia with lower urinary tract symptoms
  • N40.2 - Nodular prostate without lower urinary tract symptoms
  • N40.3 - Nodular prostate with lower urinary tract symptoms

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code N40:

Includes

Includes
This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.
  • adenofibromatous hypertrophy of prostate
  • benign hypertrophy of the prostate
  • benign prostatic hypertrophy
  • BPH
  • enlarged prostate
  • nodular prostate
  • polyp of prostate

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • benign neoplasms of prostate adenoma, benign fibroadenoma fibroma myoma D29.1

Type 2 Excludes

Type 2 Excludes
A type 2 excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • malignant neoplasm of prostate C61

Clinical Information

  • PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA-. increase in constituent cells in the prostate leading to enlargement of the organ hypertrophy and adverse impact on the lower urinary tract function. this can be caused by increased rate of cell proliferation reduced rate of cell death or both.

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the genitourinary system (N00–N99)
    • Diseases of male genital organs (N40-N53)
      • Benign prostatic hyperplasia (N40)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - Code Updated, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
    • New Description: Enlarged prostate
    • Previous Description: Enlarged prostate
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Enlarged Prostate (BPH)

The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine out of the body. As men age, their prostate grows bigger. If it gets too large, it can cause problems. An enlarged prostate is also called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Most men will get BPH as they get older. Symptoms often start after age 50.

BPH is not cancer, and it does not seem to increase your chance of getting prostate cancer. But the early symptoms are the same. Check with your doctor if you have

  • A frequent and urgent need to urinate, especially at night
  • Trouble starting a urine stream or making more than a dribble
  • A urine stream that is weak, slow, or stops and starts several times
  • The feeling that you still have to go, even just after urinating
  • Small amounts of blood in your urine

Severe BPH can cause serious problems over time, such as urinary tract infections, and bladder or kidney damage. If it is found early, you are less likely to develop these problems.

Tests for BPH include a digital rectal exam, blood and imaging tests, a urine flow study, and examination with a scope called a cystoscope. Treatments include watchful waiting, medicines, nonsurgical procedures, and surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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