ICD-10-CM Code K20

Esophagitis

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

K20 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of esophagitis. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:K20
Short Description:Esophagitis
Long Description:Esophagitis

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • K20.0 - Eosinophilic esophagitis
  • K20.8 - Other esophagitis
  • K20.9 - ... unspecified

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code K20:

Use Additional Code

Use Additional Code
The “use additional code” indicates that a secondary code could be used to further specify the patient’s condition. This note is not mandatory and is only used if enough information is available to assign an additional code.
  • code to identify:
  • alcohol abuse and dependence F10

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • erosion of esophagus K22.1
  • esophagitis with gastro-esophageal reflux disease K21.0
  • reflux esophagitis K21.0
  • ulcerative esophagitis K22.1

Type 2 Excludes

Type 2 Excludes
A type 2 excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • eosinophilic gastritis or gastroenteritis K52.81

Clinical Information

  • ESOPHAGITIS-. inflammation acute or chronic of the esophagus caused by bacteria chemicals or trauma.
  • ESOPHAGITIS PEPTIC-. inflammation of the esophagus that is caused by the reflux of gastric juice with contents of the stomach and duodenum.
  • EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS-. chronic esophagitis characterized by esophageal mucosal eosinophilia. it is diagnosed when an increase in eosinophils are present over the entire esophagus. the reflux symptoms fail to respond to proton pump inhibitors treatment unlike in gastroesophageal reflux disease. the symptoms are associated with ige mediated hypersensitivity to food or inhalant allergens.

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the digestive system (K00–K93)
    • Diseases of esophagus, stomach and duodenum (K20-K31)
      • Esophagitis (K20)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Esophagus Disorders

The esophagus is the muscular tube that carries food and liquids from your mouth to the stomach. You may not be aware of your esophagus until you swallow something too large, too hot, or too cold. You may also notice it when something is wrong. You may feel pain or have trouble swallowing.

The most common problem with the esophagus is GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). With GERD, a muscle at the end of your esophagus does not close properly. This allows stomach contents to leak back, or reflux, into the esophagus and irritate it. Over time, GERD can cause damage to the esophagus.

Other problems include heartburn, cancer, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Doctors may use various tests to make a diagnosis. These include imaging tests, an upper endoscopy, and a biopsy.

Treatment depends on the problem. Some problems get better with over-the-counter medicines or changes in diet. Others may need prescription medicines or surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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