ICD-10-CM Code I22

Subsequent ST elevation (STEMI) and non-ST elevation (NSTEMI) myocardial infarction

Version 2021 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

I22 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of subsequent st elevation (stemi) and non-st elevation (nstemi) myocardial infarction. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:I22
Short Description:Subsequent STEMI & NSTEMI mocard infrc
Long Description:Subsequent ST elevation (STEMI) and non-ST elevation (NSTEMI) myocardial infarction

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • I22.0 - Subsequent ST elevation (STEMI) myocardial infarction of anterior wall
  • I22.1 - Subsequent ST elevation (STEMI) myocardial infarction of inferior wall
  • I22.2 - Subsequent non-ST elevation (NSTEMI) myocardial infarction
  • I22.8 - Subsequent ST elevation (STEMI) myocardial infarction of other sites
  • I22.9 - Subsequent ST elevation (STEMI) myocardial infarction of unspecified site

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code I22:

Includes

Includes
This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.
  • acute myocardial infarction occurring within four weeks (28 days) of a previous acute myocardial infarction, regardless of site
  • cardiac infarction
  • coronary (artery) embolism
  • coronary (artery) occlusion
  • coronary (artery) rupture
  • coronary (artery) thrombosis
  • infarction of heart, myocardium, or ventricle
  • recurrent myocardial infarction
  • reinfarction of myocardium
  • rupture of heart, myocardium, or ventricle
  • subsequent type 1 myocardial infarction

Use Additional Code

Use Additional Code
The “use additional code” indicates that a secondary code could be used to further specify the patient’s condition. This note is not mandatory and is only used if enough information is available to assign an additional code.
  • code, if applicable, to identify:
  • exposure to environmental tobacco smoke Z77.22
  • history of tobacco dependence Z87.891
  • occupational exposure to environmental tobacco smoke Z57.31
  • status post administration of tPA rtPA in a different facility within the last 24 hours prior to admission to current facility Z92.82
  • tobacco dependence F17
  • tobacco use Z72.0

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • subsequent myocardial infarction, type 2 I21.A1
  • subsequent myocardial infarction of other type type 3 type 4 type 5 I21.A9

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the circulatory system (I00–I99)
    • Ischemic heart diseases (I20-I25)
      • Subsequent STEMI & NSTEMI mocard infrc (I22)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Heart Attack

Also called: MI, Myocardial infarction

Each year almost 800,000 Americans have a heart attack. A heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart suddenly becomes blocked. Without the blood coming in, the heart can't get oxygen. If not treated quickly, the heart muscle begins to die. But if you do get quick treatment, you may be able to prevent or limit damage to the heart muscle. That's why it's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 911 if you or someone else is having them. You should call, even if you are not sure that it is a heart attack.

The most common symptoms in men and women are

  • Chest discomfort. It is often in center or left side of the chest. It usually lasts more than a few minutes. It may go away and come back. It can feel like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain. It also can feel like heartburn or indigestion.
  • Shortness of breath. Sometimes this is your only symptom. You may get it before or during the chest discomfort. It can happen when you are resting or doing a little bit of physical activity.
  • Discomfort in the upper body. You may feel pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, shoulders, neck, jaw, or upper part of the stomach.

You may also have other symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and lightheadedness. You may break out in a cold sweat. Sometimes women will have different symptoms then men. For example, they are more likely to feel tired for no reason.

The most common cause of heart attacks is coronary artery disease (CAD). With CAD, there is a buildup of cholesterol and other material, called plaque, on their inner walls or the arteries. This is atherosclerosis. It can build up for years. Eventually an area of plaque can rupture (break open). A blood clot can form around the plaque and block the artery.

A less common cause of heart attack is a severe spasm (tightening) of a coronary artery. The spasm cuts off blood flow through the artery.

At the hospital, health care providers make a diagnosis based on your symptoms, blood tests, and different heart health tests. Treatments may include medicines and medical procedures such as coronary angioplasty. After a heart attack, cardiac rehabilitation and lifestyle changes can help you recover.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Being active after your heart attack (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cardiac catheterization - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Heart attack (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Heart attack - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Learn What a Heart Attack Feels Like--It Could Save Your Life - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute)
  • Troponin test (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]