I08.9 - Rheumatic multiple valve disease, unspecified

Version 2023
ICD-10:I08.9
Short Description:Rheumatic multiple valve disease, unspecified
Long Description:Rheumatic multiple valve disease, unspecified
Status: Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Diseases of the circulatory system (I00–I99)
    • Chronic rheumatic heart diseases (I05-I09)
      • Multiple valve diseases (I08)

I08.9 is a billable ICD-10 code used to specify a medical diagnosis of rheumatic multiple valve disease, unspecified. The code is valid during the fiscal year 2023 from October 01, 2022 through September 30, 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Unspecified diagnosis codes like I08.9 are acceptable when clinical information is unknown or not available about a particular condition. Although a more specific code is preferable, unspecified codes should be used when such codes most accurately reflect what is known about a patient's condition. Specific diagnosis codes should not be used if not supported by the patient's medical record.

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Index to Diseases and Injuries References

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for this diagnosis code are found in the injuries and diseases index:

Convert to ICD-9 Code

Source ICD-10 CodeTarget ICD-9 Code
I08.9396.9 - Mitral/aortic v dis NOS
Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.
I08.9397.9 - Rheum endocarditis NOS
Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Patient Education


Heart Valve Diseases

What are heart valve diseases?

Heart valve disease happens when one or more of your heart valves don't work well.

Your heart has four valves: the tricuspid, pulmonary, mitral, and aortic valves. The valves have flaps that open and close. The flaps make sure that blood flows in the right direction through your heart and to the rest of your body. When your heart beats, the flaps open to let blood through. Between heartbeats they close to stop the blood from flowing backwards.

If one or more of your heart valves doesn't open or close correctly, it can affect your blood flow and strain your heart. Fortunately, treatment helps most valve diseases.

What are the types of heart valve diseases?

Heart valves can have three basic kinds of problems:

Sometimes a valve can have both regurgitation and stenosis.

What causes heart valve diseases?

Some people are born with heart valve disease. This is called congenital heart valve disease. It can happen alone or along with other congenital heart defects. Heart valve disease can also develop over time as you get older or have certain conditions that affect the heart.

Who is more likely to develop heart valve diseases?

Your chance of having heart valve disease is higher if:

What are the symptoms of heart valve diseases?

Many people live their whole lives with a heart valve that doesn't work perfectly and never have any problems. But heart valve disease may get worse slowly over time. You may develop signs and symptoms, such as:

If you don't get treatment for heart valve disease, the symptoms and strain on your heart may keep getting worse.

What other problems can heart valve diseases cause?

When the valves don't work well, your heart has to pump harder to get enough blood out to the body. Without treatment, this extra workload on your heart can lead to:

How is heart valve disease diagnosed?

Your health care provider may listen to your heart with a stethoscope and hear that your heart makes abnormal sounds, such as a click or a heart murmur. These sounds may mean a valve isn't working normally. The provider will usually refer you to a cardiologist, a doctor who specializes in heart diseases.

The doctor will also listen to your heart and will do a physical exam. You will also likely need to have one or more heart tests.

What are the treatments for heart valve diseases?

Most heart valve problems can be treated successfully. Treatment may include:

It's possible that you may need surgery, even if you don't have symptoms. Fixing the valve can help can prevent future heart problems.

There are many ways to do heart valve surgery. You and your doctor can decide what's best for you, based on your valve problem and general health. Heart valve repair surgery has fewer risks than heart valve replacement. So, when repair is possible, it's preferred over valve replacement.

In some cases, valve replacement is necessary. There are 2 types of replacement valves:

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Streptococcal Infections

Strep is short for Streptococcus, a type of bacteria. There are several types. Two of them cause most of the strep infections in people: group A and group B.

Group A strep causes:

Group B strep can cause blood infections, pneumonia and meningitis in newborns. A screening test during pregnancy can tell if you have it. If you do, intravenous (IV) antibiotics during labor can save your baby's life. Adults can also get group B strep infections, especially if they are 65 or older or already have health problems. Strep B can cause urinary tract infections, blood infections, skin infections and pneumonia in adults.

Antibiotics are used to treat strep infections.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History