ICD-10-CM Code H53.59

Other color vision deficiencies

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

H53.59 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other color vision deficiencies. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code H53.59 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like abnormal color vision, abnormal color vision, chloropsia, chromatic aberration of vision, chromatopsia, o/e - red-green color blindness, etc

ICD-10:H53.59
Short Description:Other color vision deficiencies
Long Description:Other color vision deficiencies

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code H53.59 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Abnormal color vision
  • Abnormal color vision
  • Chloropsia
  • Chromatic aberration of vision
  • Chromatopsia
  • O/E - red-green color blindness
  • Reduced color discrimination
  • Reduced red-green discrimination

Clinical Information

  • COLOR VISION DEFECTS-. defects of color vision are mainly hereditary traits but can be secondary to acquired or developmental abnormalities in the cones retina. severity of hereditary defects of color vision depends on the degree of mutation of the rod opsins genes on x chromosome and chromosome 3 that code the photopigments for red green and blue.

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code H53.59 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 124 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITH MCC
  • 125 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITHOUT MCC

Convert H53.59 to ICD-9

  • 368.59 - Color deficiency NEC (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the eye and adnexa (H00–H59)
    • Visual disturbances and blindness (H53-H54)
      • Visual disturbances (H53)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Color Blindness

Most of us see our world in color. We enjoy looking at a lush green lawn or a red rose in full bloom. If you have a color vision defect, you may see these colors differently than most people.

There are three main kinds of color vision defects. Red-green color vision defects are the most common. This type occurs in men more than in women. The other major types are blue-yellow color vision defects and a complete absence of color vision.

Most of the time, color blindness is genetic. There is no treatment, but most people adjust and the condition doesn't limit their activities.

  • Color blindness (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Color vision test (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Color vision deficiency Color vision deficiency (sometimes called color blindness) represents a group of conditions that affect the perception of color. Red-green color vision defects are the most common form of color vision deficiency. Affected individuals have trouble distinguishing between some shades of red, yellow, and green. Blue-yellow color vision defects (also called tritan defects), which are rarer, cause problems with differentiating shades of blue and green and cause difficulty distinguishing dark blue from black. These two forms of color vision deficiency disrupt color perception but do not affect the sharpness of vision (visual acuity).A less common and more severe form of color vision deficiency called blue cone monochromacy causes very poor visual acuity and severely reduced color vision. Affected individuals have additional vision problems, which can include increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary back-and-forth eye movements (nystagmus), and nearsightedness (myopia). Blue cone monochromacy is sometimes considered to be a form of achromatopsia, a disorder characterized by a partial or total lack of color vision with other vision problems.
[Learn More]