ICD-10-CM Code H35.142

Retinopathy of prematurity, stage 3, left eye

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

H35.142 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of retinopathy of prematurity, stage 3, left eye. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code H35.142 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like retinopathy of prematurity of left eye or retinopathy of prematurity of left eye stage 3 - ridge with extraretinal fibrovascular proliferation or retinopathy of prematurity stage 3 - ridge with extraretinal fibrovascular proliferation.

ICD-10:H35.142
Short Description:Retinopathy of prematurity, stage 3, left eye
Long Description:Retinopathy of prematurity, stage 3, left eye

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Retinopathy of prematurity of left eye
  • Retinopathy of prematurity of left eye stage 3 - ridge with extraretinal fibrovascular proliferation
  • Retinopathy of prematurity stage 3 - ridge with extraretinal fibrovascular proliferation

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code H35.142 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 124 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITH MCC
  • 125 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITHOUT MCC

Convert H35.142 to ICD-9

  • 362.25 - Retinoph prematr,stage 3 (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the eye and adnexa (H00–H59)
    • Disorders of choroid and retina (H30-H36)
      • Other retinal disorders (H35)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Premature Babies

Also called: Preemies

Almost 1 of every 10 infants born in the United States are premature, or preemies. A premature birth is when a baby is born before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy. A full-term pregnancy is 40 weeks.

Important growth and development happen throughout pregnancy - especially in the final months and weeks. Because they are born too early, preemies weigh much less than full-term babies. They may have health problems because their organs did not have enough time to develop. Problems that a baby born too early may have include

  • Breathing problems
  • Feeding difficulties
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Developmental delay
  • Vision problems
  • Hearing problems

Preemies need special medical care in a neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU. They stay there until their organ systems can work on their own.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Apnea of prematurity (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neonatal weight gain and nutrition (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Osteopenia - premature infants (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Premature infant (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Preterm labor (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Retinal Disorders

The retina is a layer of tissue in the back of your eye that senses light and sends images to your brain. In the center of this nerve tissue is the macula. It provides the sharp, central vision needed for reading, driving and seeing fine detail.

Retinal disorders affect this vital tissue. They can affect your vision, and some can be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are

  • Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision
  • Diabetic eye disease
  • Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is pulled away from the back of the eye
  • Retinoblastoma - cancer of the retina. It is most common in young children.
  • Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula
  • Macular hole - a small break in the macula that usually happens to people over 60
  • Floaters - cobwebs or specks in your field of vision

NIH: National Eye Institute

  • Amaurosis fugax (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Central serous choroidopathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Electroretinography (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Fluorescein angiography (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • High blood pressure and eye disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Home vision tests (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Intravitreal injection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Retinal artery occlusion (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Retinal vein occlusion (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]