ICD-10-CM Code H18.54

Lattice corneal dystrophy

Version 2021 Replaced Code Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

H18.54 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of lattice corneal dystrophy. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:H18.54
Short Description:Lattice corneal dystrophy
Long Description:Lattice corneal dystrophy

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2021 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2020. This code was replaced for the FY 2021 (October 1, 2020 - September 30, 2021).

  • H18.541 - Lattice corneal dystrophy, right eye
  • H18.542 - Lattice corneal dystrophy, left eye
  • H18.543 - Lattice corneal dystrophy, bilateral
  • H18.549 - Lattice corneal dystrophy, unspecified eye

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code H18.54 are found in the index:


Convert H18.54 to ICD-9

  • 371.54 - Lattice cornea dystrophy

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the eye and adnexa (H00–H59)
    • Disorders of sclera, cornea, iris and ciliary body (H15-H22)
      • Other disorders of cornea (H18)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - Code Deleted, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Corneal Disorders

Your cornea is the outermost layer of your eye. It is clear and shaped like a dome. The cornea helps to shield the rest of the eye from germs, dust, and other harmful matter. It also helps your eye to focus. If you wear contact lenses, they float on top of your corneas.

Problems with the cornea include

  • Refractive errors
  • Allergies
  • Infections
  • Injuries
  • Dystrophies - conditions in which parts of the cornea lose clarity due to a buildup of cloudy material

Treatments of corneal disorders include medicines, corneal transplantation, and corneal laser surgery.

NIH: National Eye Institute

  • Cloudy cornea (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Corneal injury (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Corneal transplant (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Corneal ulcers and infections (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Fuchs dystrophy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Keratoconus (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Lattice corneal dystrophy type II Lattice corneal dystrophy type II is characterized by an accumulation of protein clumps called amyloid deposits in tissues throughout the body. The deposits frequently occur in blood vessel walls and basement membranes, which are thin, sheet-like structures that separate and support cells in many tissues. Amyloid deposits lead to characteristic signs and symptoms involving the eyes, nerves, and skin that worsen with age.The earliest sign of this condition, which is usually identified in a person's twenties, is accumulation of amyloid deposits in the cornea (lattice corneal dystrophy). The cornea is the clear, outer covering of the eye. It is made up of several layers of tissue, and in lattice corneal dystrophy type II, the amyloid deposits form in the stromal layer. The amyloid deposits form as delicate, branching fibers that create a lattice pattern. Because these protein deposits cloud the cornea, they often lead to vision impairment. In addition, affected individuals can have recurrent corneal erosions, which are caused by separation of particular layers of the cornea from one another. Corneal erosions are very painful and can cause sensitivity to bright light (photophobia). Amyloid deposits and corneal erosions are usually bilateral, which means they affect both eyes.As lattice corneal dystrophy type II progresses, the nerves become involved, typically starting in a person's forties. It is thought that the amyloid deposits disrupt nerve function. Dysfunction of the nerves in the head and face (cranial nerves) can cause paralysis of facial muscles (facial palsy); decreased sensations in the face (facial hypoesthesia); and difficulty speaking, chewing, and swallowing. Dysfunction of the nerves that connect the brain and spinal cord to muscles and to sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, and heat (peripheral nerves) can cause loss of sensation and weakness in the limbs (peripheral neuropathy). Peripheral neuropathy usually occurs in the lower legs and arms, leading to muscle weakness, clumsiness, and difficulty sensing vibrations.The skin is also commonly affected in people with lattice corneal dystrophy type II, typically beginning in a person's forties. People with this condition may have thickened, sagging skin, especially on the scalp and forehead, and a condition called cutis laxa, which is characterized by loose skin that lacks elasticity. The skin can also be dry and itchy. Because of loose skin and muscle paralysis in the face, individuals with lattice corneal dystrophy type II can have a facial expression that appears sad.
[Learn More]

Lattice corneal dystrophy type I Lattice corneal dystrophy type I is an eye disorder that affects the clear, outer covering of the eye called the cornea. The cornea must remain clear for an individual to see properly; however, in lattice corneal dystrophy type I, protein clumps known as amyloid deposits cloud the cornea, which leads to vision impairment. The cornea is made up of several layers of tissue, and in lattice corneal dystrophy type I, the deposits form in the stromal layer. The amyloid deposits form as delicate, branching fibers that create a lattice pattern.Affected individuals often have recurrent corneal erosions, which are caused by separation of particular layers of the cornea from one another. Corneal erosions are very painful and can cause sensitivity to bright light (photophobia). Lattice corneal dystrophy type I is usually bilateral, which means it affects both eyes. The condition becomes apparent in childhood or adolescence and leads to vision problems by early adulthood.
[Learn More]