ICD-10-CM Code G45

Transient cerebral ischemic attacks and related syndromes

Version 2021 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

G45 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of transient cerebral ischemic attacks and related syndromes. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:G45
Short Description:Transient cerebral ischemic attacks and related syndromes
Long Description:Transient cerebral ischemic attacks and related syndromes

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • G45.0 - Vertebro-basilar artery syndrome
  • G45.1 - Carotid artery syndrome (hemispheric)
  • G45.2 - Multiple and bilateral precerebral artery syndromes
  • G45.3 - Amaurosis fugax
  • G45.4 - Transient global amnesia
  • G45.8 - Other transient cerebral ischemic attacks and related syndromes
  • G45.9 - Transient cerebral ischemic attack, unspecified

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code G45:

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • neonatal cerebral ischemia P91.0
  • transient retinal artery occlusion H34.0

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Episodic and paroxysmal disorders (G40-G47)
      • Transient cerebral ischemic attacks and related syndromes (G45)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Transient Ischemic Attack

Also called: Mini-stroke, TIA

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a stroke that lasts only a few minutes. It happens when the blood supply to part of the brain is briefly blocked. Symptoms of a TIA are like other stroke symptoms, but do not last as long. They happen suddenly, and include

  • Numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body
  • Confusion or trouble speaking or understanding speech
  • Trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Difficulty walking
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of balance or coordination

Most symptoms of a TIA disappear within an hour, although they may last for up to 24 hours. Because you cannot tell if these symptoms are from a TIA or a stroke, you should go to the hospital right away.

TIAs are often a warning sign for future strokes. Taking medicine, such as blood thinners, may reduce your risk of a stroke. Your doctor might also recommend surgery. You can also help lower your risk by having a healthy lifestyle. This includes not smoking, not drinking too much, eating a healthy diet, and exercising. It is also important to control other health problems, such as high blood pressure and cholesterol.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Transient ischemic attack (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Vertebrobasilar circulatory disorders (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]