2022 ICD-10-CM Code G40.812

Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, not intractable, without status epilepticus

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:G40.812
Short Description:Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, not intractable, w/o stat epi
Long Description:Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, not intractable, without status epilepticus

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Episodic and paroxysmal disorders (G40-G47)
      • Epilepsy and recurrent seizures (G40)

G40.812 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of lennox-gastaut syndrome, not intractable, without status epilepticus. The code G40.812 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code G40.812 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like cryptogenic lennox-gastaut syndrome, lennox-gastaut syndrome, lennox-gastaut syndrome, non-refractory or symptomatic lennox-gastaut syndrome.

The code G40.812 is linked to some Quality Measures as part of Medicare's Quality Payment Program (QPP). When this code is used as part of a patient's medical record the following Quality Measures might apply: Epilepsy: Counseling For Women Of Childbearing Potential With Epilepsy.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code G40.812 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Convert G40.812 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code G40.812 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Quality Payment Program Measures

When code G40.812 is part of the patient's diagnoses the following Quality Measures apply and affect reimbursement. The objective of Medicare's Quality Measures is to improve patient care by making it more: effective, safe, efficient, patient-centered and equitable.

Quality Measure Description Quality Domain Measure Type High Priority Submission Methods
Epilepsy: Counseling for Women of Childbearing Potential with EpilepsyPercentage of all patients of childbearing potential (12 years and older) diagnosed with epilepsy who were counseled at least once a year about how epilepsy and its treatment may affect contraception and pregnancy.Effective Clinical CareProcessNOClaims, Registry

Information for Patients


Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters of nerve cells, or neurons, in the brain send out the wrong signals. People may have strange sensations and emotions or behave strangely. They may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness.

Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, and abnormal brain development. In many cases, the cause is unknown.

Doctors use brain scans and other tests to diagnose epilepsy. It is important to start treatment right away. There is no cure for epilepsy, but medicines can control seizures for most people. When medicines are not working well, surgery or implanted devices such as vagus nerve stimulators may help. Special diets can help some children with epilepsy.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


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Lennox-Gastaut syndrome

Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a severe condition characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) that begin early in life. Affected individuals have multiple types of seizures, a particular pattern of brain activity (called slow spike-and-wave) measured by a test called an electroencephalogram (EEG), and impaired mental abilities.

In Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, epilepsy begins in early childhood, usually between ages 3 and 5. The most common seizure type is tonic seizures, which cause the muscles to stiffen (contract) uncontrollably. These seizures typically occur during sleep; they may also occur during wakefulness and cause sudden falls. Also common are atypical absence seizures, which cause a very brief partial or complete loss of consciousness. Additionally, many affected individuals have episodes called drop attacks, which cause sudden falls that can result in serious or life-threatening injuries. Drop attacks may be caused by sudden loss of muscle tone (described as atonic) or by abnormal muscle contraction (described as tonic). Other types of seizures have been reported less frequently in people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome often do not respond well to therapy with anti-epileptic medications.

Although each seizure episode associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is usually brief, more than two-thirds of affected individuals experience prolonged periods of seizure activity (known as status epilepticus) or episodes of many seizures that occur in a cluster.

Most children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome have intellectual disability or learning problems even before seizures begin. These problems may worsen over time, particularly if seizures are very frequent or severe. Some affected children develop additional neurological abnormalities and behavioral problems. Many also have delayed development of motor skills such as sitting and crawling. As a result of their seizures and intellectual disability, most people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome require help with the usual activities of daily living. However, a small percentage of affected adults live independently.

People with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome have a higher risk of death than their peers of the same age. Although the increased risk is not fully understood, it is partly due to poorly controlled seizures and injuries from falls.


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)