ICD-10-CM Code F91

Conduct disorders

Version 2021 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

F91 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of conduct disorders. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:F91
Short Description:Conduct disorders
Long Description:Conduct disorders

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • F91.0 - Conduct disorder confined to family context
  • F91.1 - Conduct disorder, childhood-onset type
  • F91.2 - Conduct disorder, adolescent-onset type
  • F91.3 - Oppositional defiant disorder
  • F91.8 - Other conduct disorders
  • F91.9 - Conduct disorder, unspecified

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code F91:

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • antisocial behavior Z72.81
  • antisocial personality disorder F60.2

Type 2 Excludes

Type 2 Excludes
A type 2 excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • conduct problems associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder F90
  • mood affective disorders F30 F39
  • pervasive developmental disorders F84
  • schizophrenia F20

Clinical Information

  • CONDUCT DISORDER-. a repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. these behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage deceitfulness or theft and serious violations of rules. the onset is before age 18. from dsm iv 1994

Code Classification

  • Mental and behavioural disorders (F00–F99)
    • Behavioral and emotional disorders with onset usually occurring in childhood and adolescence (F90-F98)
      • Conduct disorders (F91)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Child Behavior Disorders

Also called: Conduct disorders

All kids misbehave some times. And some may have temporary behavior problems due to stress. For example, the birth of a sibling, a divorce, or a death in the family may cause a child to act out. Behavior disorders are more serious. They involve a pattern of hostile, aggressive, or disruptive behaviors for more than 6 months. The behavior is also not appropriate for the child's age.

Warning signs can include

  • Harming or threatening themselves, other people or pets
  • Damaging or destroying property
  • Lying or stealing
  • Not doing well in school, skipping school
  • Early smoking, drinking or drug use
  • Early sexual activity
  • Frequent tantrums and arguments
  • Consistent hostility toward authority figures

If you see signs of a problem, ask for help. Poor choices can become habits. Kids who have behavior problems are at higher risk for school failure, mental health problems, and even suicide. Classes or family therapy may help parents learn to set and enforce limits. Talk therapy and behavior therapy for your child can also help.

  • Conduct disorder (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Discipline (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Oppositional defiant disorder (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Temper tantrums (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Trichotillomania (Medical Encyclopedia)

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