ICD-10 Diagnosis Code F84.0

Autistic disorder

Diagnosis Code F84.0

ICD-10: F84.0
Short Description: Autistic disorder
Long Description: Autistic disorder
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code F84.0

Valid for Submission
The code F84.0 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Mental and behavioural disorders (F00–F99)
    • Pervasive and specific developmental disorders (F80-F89)
      • Pervasive developmental disorders (F84)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9
  • 299.00 - Autistic disord-current (Approximate Flag)
  • 299.01 - Autistic disord-residual (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms
  • Active infantile autism
  • Autism and facial port-wine stain syndrome
  • Autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, arthrogryposis syndrome
  • Autistic disorder
  • Autistic disorder
  • Autistic disorder of childhood onset
  • Borderline psychosis of childhood
  • Cutaneous capillary malformation
  • Distal arthrogryposis syndrome
  • High-functioning autism
  • Infantile autism
  • Infantile psychosis
  • Pervasive developmental disorder of residual state
  • Port-wine stain of skin
  • Psychosis in early childhood
  • Psychosis with origin in childhood
  • Residual childhood psychosis
  • Residual infantile autism
  • Symbiotic infantile psychosis

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code F84.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

  • Inclusion Terms:
    • Autism spectrum disorder
    • Infantile autism
    • Infantile psychosis
    • Kanner's syndrome
  • Type 1 Excludes Notes:
    • Asperger's syndrome (F84.5)

Information for Patients


Autism Spectrum Disorder

Also called: ASD, Pervasive developmental disorder (PDD)

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological and developmental disorder that begins early in childhood and lasts throughout a person's life. It affects how a person acts and interacts with others, communicates, and learns. It includes what used to be known as Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorders.

It is called a "spectrum" disorder because people with ASD can have a range of symptoms. People with ASD might have problems talking with you, or they might not look you in the eye when you talk to them. They may also have restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. They may spend a lot of time putting things in order, or they may say the same sentence again and again. They may often seem to be in their "own world."

At well-child checkups, the health care provider should check your child's development. If there are signs of ASD, your child will have a comprehensive evaluation. It may include a team of specialists, doing various tests and evaluations to make a diagnosis.

The causes of ASD are not known. Research suggests that both genes and environment play important roles.

There is currently no one standard treatment for ASD. There are many ways to increase your child's ability to grow and learn new skills. Starting them early can lead to better results. Treatments include behavior and communication therapies, skills training, and medicines to control symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  • Asperger syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Autism (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Childhood disintegrative disorder (Medical Encyclopedia)

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Autism spectrum disorder Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a condition that appears very early in childhood development, varies in severity, and is characterized by impaired social skills, communication problems, and repetitive behaviors. These difficulties can interfere with affected individuals' ability to function in social, academic, and employment settings. People with ASD also have an increased risk of psychiatric problems such as anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and eating disorders.From as early as 1 to 2 years of age, people with ASD have an impaired ability to interact with other people; they are often more comfortable dealing with objects. Affected individuals have difficulty understanding and using non-verbal social cues such as eye contact, facial expressions, gestures, and body language. Inability to recognize and use these cues makes it hard for affected individuals to understand the feelings of others or communicate their own feelings appropriately. Behavioral signs of ASD, such as reduced eye contact and social interaction, can sometimes be detected before age 2. However, the condition is usually diagnosed between ages 2 and 4, when more advanced communication and social skills, such as learning to play with others, typically begin to develop.Repetitive behaviors in ASD can include simple actions such as rocking, hand-flapping, or repetition of words or noises (echolalia). Affected individuals often dwell on or repeatedly express particular thoughts; this behavior is called perseveration. People with ASD tend to be rigid about their established routines and may strongly resist disruptions such as changes in schedule. They may also have difficulty tolerating sensory stimuli such as loud noises or bright lights.While social and communication difficulties and unusual behaviors define ASD, affected individuals can have a wide range of intellectual abilities and language skills. A majority of people with ASD have mild to moderate intellectual disability, while others have average to above-average intelligence. Some have particular cognitive abilities that greatly surpass their overall level of functioning, often in areas such as music, mathematics, or memory.Some people with ASD do not speak at all, while others use language fluently. However, fluent speakers with ASD often have problems associated with verbal communication. They might speak in a monotone voice, have unusual vocal mannerisms, or choose unusual topics of conversation.Several diagnoses that used to be classified as separate conditions are now grouped together under the diagnosis of ASD. For example, autistic disorder was a term that was used when affected individuals had limited or absent verbal communication, often in combination with intellectual disability. By contrast, Asperger syndrome was a diagnosis formerly applied to affected individuals of average or above-average intelligence who were not delayed in their language development. The broader diagnosis of ASD was established because many affected individuals fall outside of the strict definitions of the narrower diagnoses, and their intellectual and communication abilities may change over time. However, some individuals who were previously diagnosed with one of the subtypes now do not meet all the criteria of the new umbrella diagnosis.
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ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Index of Diseases and Injuries Definitions

  • And - The word "and" should be interpreted to mean either "and" or "or" when it appears in a title.
  • Code also note - A "code also" note instructs that two codes may be required to fully describe a condition, but this note does not provide sequencing direction.
  • Code first - Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology. For such conditions, the ICD-10-CM has a coding convention that requires the underlying condition be sequenced first followed by the manifestation. Wherever such a combination exists, there is a "use additional code" note at the etiology code, and a "code first" note at the manifestation code. These instructional notes indicate the proper sequencing order of the codes, etiology followed by manifestation.
  • Type 1 Excludes Notes - A type 1 Excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • Type 2 Excludes Notes - A type 2 Excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • Includes Notes - This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.
  • Inclusion terms - List of terms is included under some codes. These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • NEC "Not elsewhere classifiable" - This abbreviation in the Alphabetic Index represents "other specified". When a specific code is not available for a condition, the Alphabetic Index directs the coder to the "other specified” code in the Tabular List.
  • NOS "Not otherwise specified" - This abbreviation is the equivalent of unspecified.
  • See - The "see" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index indicates that another term should be referenced. It is necessary to go to the main term referenced with the "see" note to locate the correct code.
  • See Also - A "see also" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index instructs that there is another main term that may also be referenced that may provide additional Alphabetic Index entries that may be useful. It is not necessary to follow the "see also" note when the original main term provides the necessary code.
  • 7th Characters - Certain ICD-10-CM categories have applicable 7th characters. The applicable 7th character is required for all codes within the category, or as the notes in the Tabular List instruct. The 7th character must always be the 7th character in the data field. If a code that requires a 7th character is not 6 characters, a placeholder X must be used to fill in the empty characters.
  • With - The word "with" should be interpreted to mean "associated with" or "due to" when it appears in a code title, the Alphabetic Index, or an instructional note in the Tabular List. The word "with" in the Alphabetic Index is sequenced immediately following the main term, not in alphabetical order.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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