ICD-10-CM Code F81.0

Specific reading disorder

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

F81.0 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of specific reading disorder. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code F81.0 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like basic learning problem, basic learning problem in reading, developmental dyslexia, developmental reading disorder, difficulty reading, dyslexia, etc

ICD-10:F81.0
Short Description:Specific reading disorder
Long Description:Specific reading disorder

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code F81.0:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • 'Backward reading'
  • Developmental dyslexia
  • Specific learning disorder, with impairment in reading
  • Specific reading retardation

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code F81.0 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Basic learning problem
  • Basic learning problem in reading
  • Developmental dyslexia
  • Developmental reading disorder
  • Difficulty reading
  • Dyslexia
  • Finding related to ability to read
  • Specific reading disorder

Convert F81.0 to ICD-9

  • 315.00 - Reading disorder NOS (Approximate Flag)
  • 315.02 - Developmental dyslexia (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Mental and behavioural disorders (F00–F99)
    • Pervasive and specific developmental disorders (F80-F89)
      • Specific developmental disorders of scholastic skills (F81)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Learning Disabilities

Also called: Learning differences, Learning disorders

What is a learning disability?

Learning disabilities are conditions that affect the ability to learn. They can cause problems with

  • Understanding what people are saying
  • Speaking
  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Doing math
  • Paying attention

Often, children have more than one kind of learning disability. They may also have another condition, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which can make learning even more of a challenge.

What causes learning disabilities?

Learning disabilities don't have anything to do with intelligence. They are caused by differences in the brain, and they affect the way the brain processes information. These differences are usually present at birth. But there are certain factors that can play a role in the development of a learning disability, including

  • Genetics
  • Environmental exposures (such as lead)
  • Problems during pregnancy (such as the mother's substance abuse)

How do I know if my child has a learning disability?

The earlier you can find and treat a learning disability, the better. Unfortunately, learning disabilities are usually not recognized until a child is in school. If you notice that your child is struggling, talk to your child's teacher or health care provider about an evaluation for a learning disability. The evaluation may include a medical exam, a discussion of family history, and intellectual and school performance testing.

What are the treatments for learning disabilities?

The most common treatment for learning disabilities is special education. A teacher or other learning specialist can help your child learn skills by building on strengths and finding ways to make up for weaknesses. Educators may try special teaching methods, make changes to the classroom, or use technologies that can assist your child's learning needs. Some children also get help from tutors or speech or language therapists.

A child with a learning disability may struggle with low self-esteem, frustration, and other problems. Mental health professionals can help your child understand these feelings, develop coping tools, and build healthy relationships.

If your child has another condition such as ADHD, he or she will need treatment for that condition as well.

NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  • Developmental reading disorder (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Disorder of written expression (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mathematics disorder (Medical Encyclopedia)

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