ICD-10-CM Code F19.26

Other psychoactive substance dependence with psychoactive substance-induced persisting amnestic disorder

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

F19.26 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other psychoactive substance dependence with psychoactive substance-induced persisting amnestic disorder. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:F19.26
Short Description:Oth psychoactv substance depend w persist amnestic disorder
Long Description:Other psychoactive substance dependence with psychoactive substance-induced persisting amnestic disorder

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code F19.26 are found in the index:


Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code F19.26 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 894 - ALCOHOL, DRUG ABUSE OR DEPENDENCE, LEFT AMA
  • 895 - ALCOHOL, DRUG ABUSE OR DEPENDENCE WITH REHABILITATION THERAPY
  • 896 - ALCOHOL, DRUG ABUSE OR DEPENDENCE WITHOUT REHABILITATION THERAPY WITH MCC
  • 897 - ALCOHOL, DRUG ABUSE OR DEPENDENCE WITHOUT REHABILITATION THERAPY WITHOUT MCC

Convert F19.26 to ICD-9

  • 292.83 - Drug persist amnestc dis (Combination Flag)
  • 304.60 - Drug depend NEC-unspec (Combination Flag)

Code Classification

  • Mental and behavioural disorders (F00–F99)
    • Mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use (F10-F19)
      • Other psychoactive substance related disorders (F19)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Drug Abuse

Also called: Substance abuse

Drug abuse is a serious public health problem that affects almost every community and family in some way. Each year drug abuse causes millions of serious illnesses or injuries among Americans. Abused drugs include

  • Methamphetamine
  • Anabolic steroids
  • Club drugs
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Inhalants
  • Marijuana
  • Prescription drugs, including opioids

Drug abuse also plays a role in many major social problems, such as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug abuse in the first place.

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

  • Drug abuse (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Drug dependence (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxicology screen (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Memory

Every day, you have different experiences and you learn new things. Your brain cannot store all of that information, so it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few seconds or minutes. Long-term memory stores it for a longer period of time.

Memory doesn't always work perfectly. As you grow older, it may take longer to remember things.

It's normal to forget things once in awhile. We've all forgotten a name, where we put our keys, or if we locked the front door. If you are a senior who forget things more often than others your age, you may have mild cognitive impairment. Forgetting how to use your phone or find your way home may be signs of a more serious problem, such as

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Other types of dementia
  • Stroke
  • Depression
  • Head injuries
  • Blood clots or tumors in the brain
  • Kidney, liver, or thyroid problems
  • Reactions to certain medicines

If you're worried about your forgetfulness, see your health care provider.

NIH: National Institute on Aging

  • Memory loss (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mental status testing (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Remembering tips (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]