ICD-10 Code B95.3

Streptococcus pneumoniae causing diseases classd elswhr

Diagnosis Code B95.3

ICD-10: B95.3
Short Description: Streptococcus pneumoniae causing diseases classd elswhr
Long Description: Streptococcus pneumoniae as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere
Version 2019 of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code B95.3

Valid for Submission
The code B95.3 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Bacterial and viral infectious agents (B95-B97)
      • Strep as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere (B95)
Version 2019 Billable Code Unacceptable Principal Diagnosis

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Unacceptable principal diagnosis - There are selected codes that describe a circumstance which influences an individual’s health status but not a current illness or injury, or codes that are not specific manifestations but may be due to an underlying cause. These codes are considered unacceptable as a principal diagnosis.

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code B95.3 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V35.0)

  • 867 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 868 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 869 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9
  • 041.09 - Other streptococcus (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms
  • Acute bacterial pericarditis
  • Acute bacterial pharyngitis
  • Acute bacterial tonsillitis
  • Acute pneumococcal laryngitis
  • Acute pneumococcal pericarditis
  • Acute pneumococcal pharyngitis
  • Acute pneumococcal tonsillitis
  • Acute streptococcal pericarditis
  • Acute tonsillitis caused by Streptococcus
  • Bacterial otitis media
  • Bacterial pleurisy with effusion
  • Bacterial sinusitis
  • Otitis media caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae
  • Pleurisy with effusion
  • Pneumococcal laryngitis
  • Pneumococcal peritonitis
  • Pneumococcal pharyngitis
  • Pneumococcal pleurisy
  • Pneumococcal pleurisy with effusion
  • Pneumococcal tonsillitis
  • Septic myocarditis - pneumococcal
  • Septic myocarditis - streptococcal
  • Sinusitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae
  • Streptococcal laryngitis
  • Streptococcal pleurisy
  • Streptococcal pleurisy with effusion
  • Streptococcal sore throat
  • Streptococcal tonsillitis

Index to Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code B95.3 in the Index to Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Pneumococcal Infections

Also called: Streptococcus pneumoniae infections

Pneumococci are a type of streptococcus bacteria. The bacteria spread through contact with people who are ill or by healthy people who carry the bacteria in the back of their nose. Pneumococcal infections can be mild or severe. The most common types of infections are

  • Ear infections
  • Sinus infections
  • Pneumonia
  • Sepsis
  • Meningitis

How the diagnosis is made depends upon where the infection is. Your doctor will do a physical exam and health history. Possible tests may include blood, imaging, or lab tests. Treatment is with antibiotics. Vaccines can prevent pneumococcal infections. There are two vaccines. One is for infants and young children. The other is for people at high risk, including those who are over 65 years old, have chronic illnesses or weak immune systems, smoke, have asthma, or live in long-term care facilities.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Meningitis - pneumococcal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13): What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pneumococcal Disease: Information for Parents (American Academy of Family Physicians)
  • Pneumococcal Disease: Information for Parents (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pneumococcal Disease: Information for Parents (American Academy of Pediatrics)
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Immunization Action Coalition)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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