ICD-10 Code B02.32

Zoster iridocyclitis

Version 2019 Billable Code
ICD-10: B02.32
Short Description:Zoster iridocyclitis
Long Description:Zoster iridocyclitis

Valid for Submission

ICD-10 B02.32 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of zoster iridocyclitis. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Viral infections characterized by skin and mucous membrane lesions (B00-B09)
      • Zoster [herpes zoster] (B02)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code B02.32 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V36.0 applicable from 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2019.

  • 124 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITH MCC
  • 125 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITHOUT MCC

Convert B02.32 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 053.22 - H zoster iridocyclitis

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • Herpes zoster iridocyclitis
  • Herpes zoster iritis
  • Herpetic iridocyclitis
  • Iridocyclitis of left eye
  • Iridocyclitis of left eye due to herpes zoster
  • Iridocyclitis of right eye
  • Iridocyclitis of right eye due to herpes zoster
  • Iritis of left eye
  • Iritis of right eye

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code B02.32 are found in the index:


Information for Patients


Eye Infections

Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are

  • Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is often due to an infection. Children frequently get it, and it is very contagious.
  • Stye - a bump on the eyelid that happens when bacteria from your skin get into the hair follicle of an eyelash.

Symptoms of eye infections may include redness, itching, swelling, discharge, pain, or problems with vision. Treatment depends on the cause of the infection and may include compresses, eye drops, creams, or antibiotics.

  • Blepharitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Corneal ulcers and infections (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cytomegalovirus retinitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dacryoadenitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Endophthalmitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Eye burning - itching and discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Eye redness (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meibomianitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Orbital cellulitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Parinaud oculoglandular syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Periorbital cellulitis (Medical Encyclopedia)

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Shingles Shingles (also known as herpes zoster) results from infection by the varicella zoster virus. This common virus causes chickenpox (also known as varicella), which is characterized by itchy spots on the skin that cover the whole body and usually occurs in childhood or adolescence. After the body fights the initial infection, the varicella zoster virus remains in nerve cells for the rest of a person's life. Because the virus is controlled by immune system cells called T cells, it is generally inactive (latent) and typically causes no health problems. However, in some people, the virus becomes active again (reactivates) and causes shingles. Shingles can occur at any age, although it is rare in childhood and becomes more common after age 50.Shingles is characterized by a severely painful, itchy, or tingling rash, most commonly on one side of the torso, although it can occur anywhere on the body. Reactivation of the virus usually occurs in a single nerve, leading to the symptoms of shingles in just the region of skin connected to that nerve. When the nerve connected to the eye and the skin surrounding it is affected, the condition is called herpes zoster ophthalmicus. This form of shingles, which accounts for about 20 percent of cases, can cause permanent vision impairment.Some individuals with shingles feel throbbing or tingling in the affected region shortly before the rash appears. Blisters form in the rash area, break open, and scab over in a few days. Healing usually takes 2 to 4 weeks. Most people have only one episode of shingles, although it can recur in rare cases.In 5 to 20 percent of people with shingles, severe pain continues in the affected region after healing of the rash, which is known as postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). PHN is the most common complication of shingles. It can also involve severe itchiness or an overactive pain response to things that do not usually cause pain (allodynia), such as a light touch. PHN can last weeks, months, or even years. The likelihood of developing PHN after shingles and its severity increase with age. The pain caused by shingles and PHN can disrupt day-to-day activities and reduce a person's quality of life.
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ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.