ICD-10 Diagnosis Code M80.049D

Age-rel osteopor w crnt path fx, unsp hand, 7thD

Diagnosis Code M80.049D

ICD-10: M80.049D
Short Description: Age-rel osteopor w crnt path fx, unsp hand, 7thD
Long Description: Age-related osteoporosis with current pathological fracture, unspecified hand, subsequent encounter for fracture with routine healing
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code M80.049D

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue
    • Disorders of bone density and structure (M80-M85)
      • Osteoporosis with current pathological fracture (M80)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Adult diagnoses Additional informationCallout TooltipAdult diagnoses
Adult. Age range is 15–124 years inclusive (e.g., senile delirium, mature cataract).

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code M80.049D is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Information for Patients


Also called: Broken bone

A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open or compound fracture. Fractures commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the bone.

Symptoms of a fracture are

  • Intense pain
  • Deformity - the limb looks out of place
  • Swelling, bruising, or tenderness around the injury
  • Numbness and tingling
  • Problems moving a limb

You need to get medical care right away for any fracture. An x-ray can tell if your bone is broken. You may need to wear a cast or splint. Sometimes you need surgery to put in plates, pins or screws to keep the bone in place.

  • Ankle fracture - aftercare
  • Broken bone
  • Broken collarbone - aftercare
  • Closed reduction of a fractured bone
  • Closed reduction of a fractured bone - aftercare
  • Hand fracture - aftercare
  • Metatarsal fracture (acute) - aftercare
  • Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare
  • Radial head fracture - aftercare
  • What Are Growth Plate Injuries? - NIH (National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)

[Read More]

Hand Injuries and Disorders

No matter how old you are or what you do for a living, you are always using your hands. When there is something wrong with them, you may not be able to do your regular activities.

Hand problems include

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome - compression of a nerve as it goes through the wrist, often making your fingers feel numb
  • Injuries that result in fractures, ruptured ligaments and dislocations
  • Osteoarthritis - wear-and-tear arthritis, which can also cause deformity
  • Tendinitis - irritation of the tendons
  • Disorders and injuries of your fingers and thumb

  • Brachial plexopathy
  • Claw hand
  • Dupuytrens contracture
  • Hand fracture - aftercare
  • Hand or foot spasms
  • Hand x-ray
  • Radial nerve dysfunction
  • Ulnar nerve dysfunction

[Read More]


Osteoporosis makes your bones weak and more likely to break. Anyone can develop osteoporosis, but it is common in older women. As many as half of all women and a quarter of men older than 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis.

Risk factors include

  • Getting older
  • Being small and thin
  • Having a family history of osteoporosis
  • Taking certain medicines
  • Being a white or Asian woman
  • Having osteopenia, which is low bone density

Osteoporosis is a silent disease. You might not know you have it until you break a bone. A bone mineral density test is the best way to check your bone health. To keep bones strong, eat a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, exercise and do not smoke. If needed, medicines can also help.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Bone mineral density test
  • Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones
  • Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones
  • Medicines for osteoporosis
  • Osteoporosis
  • What causes bone loss?

[Read More]
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