ICD-10 Diagnosis Code G72.3

Periodic paralysis

Diagnosis Code G72.3

ICD-10: G72.3
Short Description: Periodic paralysis
Long Description: Periodic paralysis
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code G72.3

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the nervous system
    • Diseases of myoneural junction and muscle (G70-G73)
      • Other and unspecified myopathies (G72)

Information for Medical Professionals

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 359.3 - Periodic paralysis

  • Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis
  • Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis
  • Familial normokalemic periodic paralysis
  • Familial periodic paralysis
  • periodic paralysis
  • Secondary periodic paralysis
  • Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis
  • Westphal disease

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code G72.3 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


Also called: Hemiplegia, Palsy, Paraplegia, Quadriplegia

Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia.

Most paralysis is due to strokes or injuries such as spinal cord injury or a broken neck. Other causes of paralysis include

  • Nerve diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Autoimmune diseases such as Guillain-Barre syndrome
  • Bell's palsy, which affects muscles in the face

Polio used to be a cause of paralysis, but polio no longer occurs in the U.S.

  • Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis
  • Hypokalemic periodic paralysis
  • Muscle function loss

[Read More]

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a condition that causes episodes of extreme muscle weakness or paralysis, usually beginning in infancy or early childhood. Most often, these episodes involve a temporary inability to move muscles in the arms and legs. Episodes tend to increase in frequency until mid-adulthood, after which they occur less frequently. Factors that can trigger attacks include rest after exercise, potassium-rich foods such as bananas and potatoes, stress, fatigue, alcohol, pregnancy, exposure to cold temperatures, certain medications, and periods without food (fasting). Muscle strength usually returns to normal between attacks, although many affected people continue to experience mild stiffness (myotonia), particularly in muscles of the face and hands.Most people with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis have increased levels of potassium in their blood (hyperkalemia) during attacks. Hyperkalemia results when the weak or paralyzed muscles release potassium ions into the bloodstream. In other cases, attacks are associated with normal blood potassium levels (normokalemia). Ingesting potassium can trigger attacks in affected individuals, even if blood potassium levels do not go up.
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Hypokalemic periodic paralysis Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a condition that causes episodes of extreme muscle weakness typically beginning in childhood or adolescence. Most often, these episodes involve a temporary inability to move muscles in the arms and legs. Attacks cause severe weakness or paralysis that usually lasts from hours to days. Some people may have episodes almost every day, while others experience them weekly, monthly, or only rarely. Attacks can occur without warning or can be triggered by factors such as rest after exercise, a viral illness, or certain medications. Often, a large, carbohydrate-rich meal or vigorous exercise in the evening can trigger an attack upon waking the following morning. Although affected individuals usually regain their muscle strength between attacks, repeated episodes can lead to persistent muscle weakness later in life.People with hypokalemic periodic paralysis have reduced levels of potassium in their blood (hypokalemia) during episodes of muscle weakness. Researchers are investigating how low potassium levels may be related to the muscle abnormalities in this condition.
[Read More]
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