2021 ICD-10-CM Code P74

Other transitory neonatal electrolyte and metabolic disturbances

Version 2021
Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

P74 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of other transitory neonatal electrolyte and metabolic disturbances. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

ICD-10:P74
Short Description:Oth transitory neonatal electrolyte and metabolic disturb
Long Description:Other transitory neonatal electrolyte and metabolic disturbances

Code Classification

Specific Coding for Oth transitory neonatal electrolyte and metabolic disturb

Header codes like P74 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for oth transitory neonatal electrolyte and metabolic disturb:

  • P74.0 - Late metabolic acidosis of newborn
  • P74.1 - Dehydration of newborn
  • P74.2 - Disturbances of sodium balance of newborn
  • P74.21 - Hypernatremia of newborn
  • P74.22 - Hyponatremia of newborn
  • P74.3 - Disturbances of potassium balance of newborn
  • P74.31 - Hyperkalemia of newborn
  • P74.32 - Hypokalemia of newborn
  • P74.4 - Other transitory electrolyte disturbances of newborn
  • P74.41 - Alkalosis of newborn
  • P74.42 - Disturbances of chlorine balance of newborn
  • P74.421 - Hyperchloremia of newborn
  • P74.422 - Hypochloremia of newborn
  • P74.49 - Other transitory electrolyte disturbance of newborn
  • P74.5 - Transitory tyrosinemia of newborn
  • P74.6 - Transitory hyperammonemia of newborn
  • P74.8 - Other transitory metabolic disturbances of newborn
  • P74.9 - Transitory metabolic disturbance of newborn, unspecified

Information for Patients


Fluid and Electrolyte Balance

Electrolytes are minerals in your body that have an electric charge. They are in your blood, urine, tissues, and other body fluids. Electrolytes are important because they help

Sodium, calcium, potassium, chlorine, phosphate, and magnesium are all electrolytes. You get them from the foods you eat and the fluids you drink.

The levels of electrolytes in your body can become too low or too high. This can happen when the amount of water in your body changes. The amount of water that you take in should equal the amount you lose. If something upsets this balance, you may have too little water (dehydration) or too much water (overhydration). Some medicines, vomiting, diarrhea, sweating, and liver or kidney problems can all upset your water balance.

Treatment helps you to manage the imbalance. It also involves identifying and treating what caused the imbalance.


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Metabolic Disorders

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat.

A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. There are different groups of disorders. Some affect the breakdown of amino acids, carbohydrates, or lipids. Another group, mitochondrial diseases, affects the parts of the cells that produce the energy.

You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example.


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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)