ICD-10 Code P74.4

Other transitory electrolyte disturbances of newborn

Version 2019 Replaced Code Non-Billable Code
ICD-10: P74.4
Short Description:Other transitory electrolyte disturbances of newborn
Long Description:Other transitory electrolyte disturbances of newborn

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10 P74.4 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of other transitory electrolyte disturbances of newborn. The code is NOT valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • P74.41 - Alkalosis of newborn
  • P74.42 - Disturbances of chlorine balance of newborn
  • P74.421 - Hyperchloremia of newborn
  • P74.422 - Hypochloremia of newborn
  • P74.49 - Other transitory electrolyte disturbance of newborn

Deleted Code

This code was deleted in the 2019 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2018. This code was replaced for the FY 2019 (October 1, 2018 - September 30, 2019).

  • P74.41 - Alkalosis of newborn
  • P74.421 - Hyperchloremia of newborn
  • P74.422 - Hypochloremia of newborn
  • P74.49 - Other transitory electrolyte disturbance of newborn

Code Classification

  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period (P00–P96)
    • Transitory endocrine and metabolic disorders specific to newborn (P70-P74)
      • Oth transitory neonatal electrolyte and metabolic disturb (P74)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert P74.4 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 775.5 - Neonatal dehydration (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • Chloride disorder
  • Electrolyte depletion
  • Electrolyte imbalance
  • Hyperchloremia
  • Hypocapnia
  • Hypochloremia
  • Increased anion gap
  • Isolated hyperchlorhidrosis
  • Perinatal disorder of electrolytes
  • Potassium disorder
  • Reduced anion gap
  • Reversed anion gap
  • Sodium disorder
  • Transitory neonatal electrolyte disturbance

Information for Patients


Fluid and Electrolyte Balance

Electrolytes are minerals in your body that have an electric charge. They are in your blood, urine, tissues, and other body fluids. Electrolytes are important because they help

  • Balance the amount of water in your body
  • Balance your body's acid/base (pH) level
  • Move nutrients into your cells
  • Move wastes out of your cells
  • Make sure that your nerves, muscles, the heart, and the brain work the way they should

Sodium, calcium, potassium, chlorine, phosphate, and magnesium are all electrolytes. You get them from the foods you eat and the fluids you drink.

The levels of electrolytes in your body can become too low or too high. This can happen when the amount of water in your body changes. The amount of water that you take in should equal the amount you lose. If something upsets this balance, you may have too little water (dehydration) or too much water (overhydration). Some medicines, vomiting, diarrhea, sweating, and liver or kidney problems can all upset your water balance.

Treatment helps you to manage the imbalance. It also involves identifying and treating what caused the imbalance.

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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.

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ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.