ICD-10 Code O35.5XX2

Maternal care for (suspected) damage to fetus by drugs, fetus 2

Version 2019 Billable Code Maternity Diagnoses Diagnoses For Females Only

Valid for Submission

O35.5XX2 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of maternal care for (suspected) damage to fetus by drugs, fetus 2. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: O35.5XX2
Short Description:Maternal care for damage to fetus by drugs, fetus 2
Long Description:Maternal care for (suspected) damage to fetus by drugs, fetus 2

Code Classification

  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00–O99)
    • Maternal care related to the fetus and amniotic cavity and possible delivery problems (O30-O48)
      • Maternal care for known or suspected fetal abnlt and damage (O35)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Maternity diagnoses - Maternity. Age range is 12–55 years inclusive (e.g., diabetes in pregnancy, antepartum pulmonary complication).
  • Diagnoses for females only - Medicare Code Editor detects inconsistencies between a patient’s sex and any diagnosis on the patient’s record, this code applies to FEMALES only .

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code O35.5XX2 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 817 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITH MCC
  • 818 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITH CC
  • 819 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert O35.5XX2 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 655.51 - Fet damag d/t drug-deliv (Approximate Flag)
  • 655.53 - Fet damg d/t drug-antepa (Approximate Flag)

Information for Patients


Pregnancy and Drug Use

When you are pregnant, you are not just "eating for two." You also breathe and drink for two. If you smoke, use alcohol or take illegal drugs, so does your unborn baby.

To protect your baby, you should avoid

  • Tobacco. Smoking during pregnancy passes nicotine, carbon monoxide, and other harmful chemicals to your baby. This could cause many problems for your unborn baby's development. It raises the risk of your baby being born too small, too early, or with birth defects. Smoking can also affect babies after they are born. Your baby would be more likely to develop diseases such as asthma and obesity. There is also a higher risk of dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
  • Drinking alcohol. There is no known amount of alcohol that is safe for a woman to drink during pregnancy. If you drink alcohol when you are pregnant, your child could be born with lifelong fetal alcohol syndrome disorders (FASD). Children with FASD can have a mix of physical, behavioral, and learning problems.
  • Illegal drugs. Using illegal drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamines may cause underweight babies, birth defects, or withdrawal symptoms after birth.
  • Misusing prescription drugs. If you are taking prescription medicines, carefully follow your health care provider's instructions. It can be dangerous to take more medicines than you are supposed to, use them to get high, or take someone else's medicines. For example, misusing opioids can cause birth defects, withdrawal in the baby, or even loss of the baby.

If you are pregnant and you are doing any of these things, get help. Your healthcare provider can recommend programs to help you quit. You and your baby's health depend on it.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health


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ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.