ICD-10 Diagnosis Code M10.479

Other secondary gout, unspecified ankle and foot

Diagnosis Code M10.479

ICD-10: M10.479
Short Description: Other secondary gout, unspecified ankle and foot
Long Description: Other secondary gout, unspecified ankle and foot
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code M10.479

Valid for Submission
The code M10.479 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Inflammatory polyarthropathies (M05-M14)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code M10.479 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V35.0)

  • 553 - BONE DISEASES AND ARTHROPATHIES WITH MCC
  • 554 - BONE DISEASES AND ARTHROPATHIES WITHOUT MCC

Convert to ICD-9
  • 274.89 - Gout w manifestation NEC (Approximate Flag)

Information for Patients


Gout

Also called: Gouty arthritis

Gout is a common, painful form of arthritis. It causes swollen, red, hot and stiff joints.

Gout happens when uric acid builds up in your body. Uric acid comes from the breakdown of substances called purines. Purines are in your body's tissues and in foods, such as liver, dried beans and peas, and anchovies. Normally, uric acid dissolves in the blood. It passes through the kidneys and out of the body in urine. But sometimes uric acid can build up and form needle-like crystals. When they form in your joints, it is very painful. The crystals can also cause kidney stones.

Often, gout first attacks your big toe. It can also attack ankles, heels, knees, wrists, fingers, and elbows. At first, gout attacks usually get better in days. Eventually, attacks last longer and happen more often.

You are more likely to get gout if you

  • Are a man
  • Have family member with gout
  • Are overweight
  • Drink alcohol
  • Eat too many foods rich in purines

Gout can be hard to diagnose. Your doctor may take a sample of fluid from an inflamed joint to look for crystals. You can treat gout with medicines.

Pseudogout has similar symptoms and is sometimes confused with gout. However, it is caused by calcium phosphate, not uric acid.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gout (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Uric acid - blood (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Uric acid - urine (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

Previous Code
M10.472
Next Code
M10.48