2021 ICD-10-CM Code L51.1

Stevens-Johnson syndrome

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

L51.1 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of stevens-johnson syndrome. The code L51.1 is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code L51.1 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acute erythematous eruption of skin, acute erythematous eruption of skin, drug-induced erythroderma, drug-induced stevens-johnson syndrome, stevens-johnson syndrome , stevens-johnson syndrome, etc.

ICD-10:L51.1
Short Description:Stevens-Johnson syndrome
Long Description:Stevens-Johnson syndrome

Code Classification

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code L51.1 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Convert L51.1 to ICD-9 Code

Information for Patients


Skin Conditions

Also called: Cutaneous disorders, Dermatologic disorders

Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin

Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, and itching. Allergies, irritants, your genetic makeup, and certain diseases and immune system problems can cause rashes, hives, and other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) is a severe skin reaction most often triggered by particular medications. Although Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis were once thought to be separate conditions, they are now considered part of a continuum. Stevens-Johnson syndrome represents the less severe end of the disease spectrum, and toxic epidermal necrolysis represents the more severe end.SJS/TEN often begins with a fever and flu-like symptoms. Within a few days, the skin begins to blister and peel, forming very painful raw areas called erosions that resemble a severe hot-water burn. The skin erosions usually start on the face and chest before spreading to other parts of the body. In most affected individuals, the condition also damages the mucous membranes, including the lining of the mouth and the airways, which can cause trouble with swallowing and breathing. The painful blistering can also affect the urinary tract and genitals. SJS/TEN often affects the eyes as well, causing irritation and redness of the conjunctiva, which are the mucous membranes that protect the white part of the eye and line the eyelids, and damage to the clear front covering of the eye (the cornea).Severe damage to the skin and mucous membranes makes SJS/TEN a life-threatening disease. Because the skin normally acts as a protective barrier, extensive skin damage can lead to a dangerous loss of fluids and allow infections to develop. Serious complications can include pneumonia, overwhelming bacterial infections (sepsis), shock, multiple organ failure, and death. About 10 percent of people with Stevens-Johnson syndrome die from the disease, while the condition is fatal in up to 50 percent of those with toxic epidermal necrolysis.Among people who survive, long-term effects of SJS/TEN can include changes in skin coloring (pigmentation), dryness of the skin and mucous membranes (xerosis), excess sweating (hyperhidrosis), hair loss (alopecia), and abnormal growth or loss of the fingernails and toenails. Other long-term problems can include impaired taste, difficulty urinating, and genital abnormalities. A small percentage of affected individuals develop chronic dryness or inflammation of the eyes, which can lead to increased sensitivity to light (photophobia) and vision impairment.
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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)