ICD-10 Diagnosis Code L03.123

Acute lymphangitis of right upper limb

Diagnosis Code L03.123

ICD-10: L03.123
Short Description: Acute lymphangitis of right upper limb
Long Description: Acute lymphangitis of right upper limb
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code L03.123

Valid for Submission
The code L03.123 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00–L99)
    • Infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00-L08)
      • Cellulitis and acute lymphangitis (L03)
Version 2019 Billable Code

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code L03.123 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V35.0)

  • 573 - SKIN GRAFT FOR SKIN ULCER OR CELLULITIS WITH MCC
  • 574 - SKIN GRAFT FOR SKIN ULCER OR CELLULITIS WITH CC
  • 575 - SKIN GRAFT FOR SKIN ULCER OR CELLULITIS WITHOUT CC/MCC
  • 576 - SKIN GRAFT EXCEPT FOR SKIN ULCER OR CELLULITIS WITH MCC
  • 577 - SKIN GRAFT EXCEPT FOR SKIN ULCER OR CELLULITIS WITH CC
  • 578 - SKIN GRAFT EXCEPT FOR SKIN ULCER OR CELLULITIS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9
  • 682.3 - Cellulitis of arm (Approximate Flag)
  • 682.4 - Cellulitis of hand (Approximate Flag)

Information for Patients


Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese.

But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli.

Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Actinomycosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Blood culture (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gram stain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gram stain of skin lesion (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Necrotizing soft tissue infection (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

Lymphatic Diseases

The lymphatic system is a network of tissues and organs. It is made up of

  • Lymph - a fluid that contains white blood cells that defend against germs
  • Lymph vessels - vessels that carry lymph throughout your body. They are different from blood vessels.
  • Lymph nodes - glands found throughout the lymph vessels. Along with your spleen, these nodes are where white blood cells fight infection.

Your bone marrow and thymus produce the cells in lymph. They are part of the system, too.

The lymphatic system clears away infection and keeps your body fluids in balance. If it's not working properly, fluid builds in your tissues and causes swelling, called lymphedema. Other lymphatic system problems can include infections, blockage, and cancer.

  • Cancer and lymph nodes (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cystic hygroma (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Groin lump (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lymph node biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lymph system (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lymphadenitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lymphangitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lymphofollicular hyperplasia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neck lump (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Swollen lymph nodes (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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