2022 ICD-10-CM Code I70.61

Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10:I70.61
Short Description:Athscl nonbiol bypass of the extremities w intrmt claud
Long Description:Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the circulatory system (I00–I99)
    • Diseases of arteries, arterioles and capillaries (I70-I79)
      • Atherosclerosis (I70)

I70.61 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Athscl nonbiol bypass of the extremities w intrmt claud

Non-specific codes like I70.61 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for athscl nonbiol bypass of the extremities w intrmt claud:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I70.611 for Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication, right leg
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I70.612 for Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication, left leg
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I70.613 for Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication, bilateral legs
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I70.618 for Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication, other extremity
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I70.619 for Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication, unspecified extremity

Information for Patients


Atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque hardens and narrows your arteries. That limits the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body.

Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including

Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause symptoms until it severely narrows or totally blocks an artery. Many people don't know they have it until they have a medical emergency.

A physical exam, imaging, and other diagnostic tests can tell if you have it. Medicines can slow the progress of plaque buildup. Your doctor may also recommend procedures such as angioplasty to open the arteries, or surgery on the coronary or carotid arteries. Lifestyle changes can also help. These include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, quitting smoking, and managing stress.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Peripheral Arterial Disease

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of PAD is atherosclerosis. This happens when plaque builds up on the walls of the arteries that supply blood to the arms and legs. Plaque is a substance made up of fat and cholesterol. It causes the arteries to narrow or become blocked. This can reduce or stop blood flow, usually to the legs. If severe enough, blocked blood flow can cause tissue death and can sometimes lead to amputation of the foot or leg.

The main risk factor for PAD is smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.

Many people who have PAD don't have any symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include

PAD can increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, and transient ischemic attack.

Doctors diagnose PAD with a physical exam and heart and imaging tests. Treatments include lifestyle changes, medicines, and sometimes surgery. Lifestyle changes include dietary changes, exercise, and efforts to lower high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)