ICD-10 Diagnosis Code F53

Mental and behavrl disorders assoc with the puerperium, NEC

Diagnosis Code F53

ICD-10: F53
Short Description: Mental and behavrl disorders assoc with the puerperium, NEC
Long Description: Mental and behavioral disorders associated with the puerperium, not elsewhere classified
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code F53

Not Valid for Submission
The code F53 is a "header" and not valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Deleted Code Additional informationCallout TooltipDeleted Code
The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2018. This code was replaced for the FY 2019 (October 1, 2018-September 30, 2019).

This code was deleted in the 2019 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below.
  • F53.0 - Postpartum depression
  • F53.1 - Puerperal psychosis

Code Classification
  • Mental and behavioural disorders (F00–F99)
    • Behavioral syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors (F50-F59)
      • Mental and behavrl disorders assoc with the puerperium, NEC (F53)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Decline in Edinburgh postnatal depression scale score
  • Decline in Edinburgh postnatal depression scale score at 8 months
  • Depressed mood
  • Depressed mood with postpartum onset
  • Difficulty coping
  • Difficulty coping with postpartum changes
  • Major depression in remission
  • Major depressive disorder, single episode with postpartum onset
  • Mild postnatal depression
  • Mild postnatal psychosis
  • Perinatal depression
  • Perinatal depression
  • Postpartum depression
  • Postpartum depression
  • Postpartum major depression in remission
  • Postpartum neurosis
  • Postpartum psychosis
  • Postpartum psychosis in remission
  • Severe postnatal depression
  • Severe postnatal psychosis

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code F53 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Postpartum Care

Also called: Post-pregnancy health

Taking home a new baby is one of the happiest times in a woman's life. But it also presents both physical and emotional challenges.

  • Get as much rest as possible. You may find that all you can do is eat, sleep, and care for your baby. And that is perfectly okay. You will have spotting or bleeding, like a menstrual period, off and on for up to six weeks.
  • You might also have swelling in your legs and feet, feel constipated, have menstrual-like cramping. Even if you are not breastfeeding, you can have milk leaking from your nipples, and your breasts might feel full, tender, or uncomfortable.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions on how much activity, like climbing stairs or walking, you can do for the next few weeks.
  • Doctors usually recommend that you abstain from sexual intercourse for four to six weeks after birth.

In addition to physical changes, you may feel sad or have the "baby blues." If you are extremely sad or are unable to care for yourself or your baby, you might have a serious condition called postpartum depression.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • After vaginal delivery - in the hospital (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Losing weight after pregnancy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Questions to ask your doctor about going home with your baby (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Vaginal delivery - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]

Psychotic Disorders

Also called: Psychoses

Psychotic disorders are severe mental disorders that cause abnormal thinking and perceptions. People with psychoses lose touch with reality. Two of the main symptoms are delusions and hallucinations. Delusions are false beliefs, such as thinking that someone is plotting against you or that the TV is sending you secret messages. Hallucinations are false perceptions, such as hearing, seeing, or feeling something that is not there.

Schizophrenia is one type of psychotic disorder. People with bipolar disorder may also have psychotic symptoms. Other problems that can cause psychosis include alcohol and some drugs, brain tumors, brain infections, and stroke.

Treatment depends on the cause of the psychosis. It might involve drugs to control symptoms and talk therapy. Hospitalization is an option for serious cases where a person might be dangerous to himself or others.

  • Brief psychotic disorder (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hallucinations (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Major depression with psychotic features (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mental status testing (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Psychosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Schizoaffective disorder (Medical Encyclopedia)


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F52.9
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F53.0