ICD-10-CM Code A69.2

Lyme disease

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

A69.2 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of lyme disease. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:A69.2
Short Description:Lyme disease
Long Description:Lyme disease

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • A69.20 - ... unspecified
  • A69.21 - Meningitis due to Lyme disease
  • A69.22 - Other neurologic disorders in Lyme disease
  • A69.23 - Arthritis due to Lyme disease
  • A69.29 - Other conditions associated with Lyme disease

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code A69.2:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Erythema chronicum migrans due to Borrelia burgdorferi

Clinical Information

  • POST LYME DISEASE SYNDROME-. a condition caused by long lasting and ongoing infection with the spirochete borrelia burgdorferi resulting in progressive inflammatory neurologic neuromuscular and dermatologic manifestations including encephalitis; myelitis; acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans; and arthritis.
  • LYME DISEASE-. an infectious disease caused by a spirochete borrelia burgdorferi which is transmitted chiefly by ixodes dammini see ixodes and pacificus ticks in the united states and ixodes ricinis see ixodes in europe. it is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system heart eye and joints in variable combinations. the disease was formerly known as lyme arthritis and first discovered at old lyme connecticut.
  • LYME NEUROBORRELIOSIS-. nervous system infections caused by tick borne spirochetes of the borrelia burgdorferi group. the disease may affect elements of the central or peripheral nervous system in isolation or in combination. common clinical manifestations include a lymphocytic meningitis cranial neuropathy most often a facial neuropathy polyradiculopathy and a mild loss of memory and other cognitive functions. less often more extensive inflammation involving the central nervous system encephalomyelitis may occur. in the peripheral nervous system b. burgdorferi infection is associated with mononeuritis multiplex and polyradiculoneuritis. from j neurol sci 1998 jan 8;1532:182 91
  • LYME DISEASE VACCINES-. vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent lyme disease.
  • BORRELIA BURGDORFERI-. a specific species of bacteria part of the borrelia burgdorferi group whose common name is lyme disease spirochete.

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Other spirochetal diseases (A65-A69)
      • Other spirochetal infections (A69)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection you get from the bite of an infected tick. The first symptom is usually a red rash, which may look like a bull's eye. But not all people with Lyme disease have a rash. As the infection spreads to other parts of the body, you may have

  • A fever
  • A headache
  • Body aches
  • A stiff neck
  • Fatigue

Lyme disease can be hard to diagnose because many of its symptoms are like those of the flu and other diseases. And you may not have noticed a tick bite. Your health care provider will look at your symptoms and medical history to figure out whether you have Lyme disease. Lab tests may not always give a clear answer until you have been infected for at least a few weeks.

Antibiotics can cure most cases of Lyme disease. The sooner treatment begins, the quicker and more complete the recovery.

After treatment, some patients may still have muscle or joint aches and nervous system symptoms. This is called post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). Long-term antibiotics have not been shown to help with PTLDS. However, there are ways to help with the symptoms of PTLDS, and most patients do get better with time.


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Lyme disease Lyme disease is an infectious disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria. The bacteria are transferred to humans by tick bite, specifically by blacklegged ticks (commonly known as deer ticks). The condition is named for the location in which it was first described, the town of Lyme, Connecticut.If not treated with antibiotics, Lyme disease follows three stages: early localized, early disseminated, and late disseminated infection. A small percentage of individuals have symptoms that persist months or years after treatment, which is called post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.A characteristic feature of Lyme disease, and the key feature of early localized infection, is a slowly expanding red rash on the skin (called erythema migrans) at the site of the tick bite; the rash is often bull's-eye shaped. Flu-like symptoms and enlarged lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy) are also early signs of infection. Most people who are treated at this stage never develop further symptoms.The early disseminated stage of Lyme disease occurs as the bacteria is carried throughout the body in the bloodstream. This stage occurs a few weeks after the tick bite. Signs and symptoms can include additional rashes on other parts of the body, flu-like symptoms, and lymphadenopathy. Some affected individuals develop neurologic problems (referred to as neuroborreliosis), such as paralyzed muscles in the face (facial palsy); pain, numbness, or weakness in the hands or feet; difficulty concentrating; or memory problems. Rarely, the heart is affected (Lyme carditis), causing a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations) or an irregular heartbeat.The late disseminated stage of Lyme disease can occur months to years after the tick bite. The most common feature of this stage, Lyme arthritis, is characterized by episodes of joint pain and swelling, usually affecting the knees. In rare cases, the late disseminated stage also involves neurological problems.Individuals with post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome report ongoing exhaustion (fatigue), muscle and joint achiness, headache, or difficulty concentrating even after treatment with antibiotics, when there is no evidence of the bacteria in the body. Very rarely, individuals have joint pain and swelling for months or years after successful antibiotic treatment. This complication is called antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.
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