ICD-10 Diagnosis Code N46.124

Oligospermia due to radiation

Diagnosis Code N46.124

ICD-10: N46.124
Short Description: Oligospermia due to radiation
Long Description: Oligospermia due to radiation
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code N46.124

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the genitourinary system
    • Diseases of male genital organs (N40-N53)
      • Male infertility (N46)

Information for Patients

Male Infertility

Infertility is a term doctors use if a man hasn't been able to get a woman pregnant after at least one year of trying. Causes of male infertility include

  • Physical problems with the testicles
  • Blockages in the ducts that carry sperm
  • Hormone problems
  • A history of high fevers or mumps
  • Genetic disorders
  • Lifestyle or environmental factors

About a third of the time, infertility is because of a problem with the man. One third of the time, it is a problem with the woman. Sometimes no cause can be found.

If you suspect you are infertile, see your doctor. There are tests that may tell if you have fertility problems. When it is possible to find the cause, treatments may include medicines, surgery, or assisted reproductive technology. Happily, many couples treated for infertility are able to have babies.

NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  • Semen analysis
  • Testicular biopsy

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Radiation Therapy

Also called: Brachytherapy, Radiotherapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from spreading. About half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including

  • The type of cancer
  • The size of the cancer
  • The cancer's location in the body
  • How close the cancer is to normal tissues that are sensitive to radiation
  • How far into the body the radiation needs to travel
  • Your general health and medical history
  • Whether you will have other types of cancer treatment
  • Other factors, such as your age and other medical conditions

Radiation therapy can damage normal cells as well as cancer cells. Treatment must be carefully planned to minimize side effects. Common side effects include skin changes and fatigue. Other side effects depend on the part of your body being treated.

Sometimes radiation is used with other treatments, like surgery or chemotherapy.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research)
  • Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do about Changes When You Urinate - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do about Feeling Sick to Your Stomach and Throwing Up (Nausea and Vomiting) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do When You Have Loose Stools (Diarrhea) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Oral mucositis
  • Radiation enteritis
  • Radiation therapy
  • Radiation therapy -- skin care
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)

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