ICD-10 Diagnosis Code K70.10

Alcoholic hepatitis without ascites

Diagnosis Code K70.10

ICD-10: K70.10
Short Description: Alcoholic hepatitis without ascites
Long Description: Alcoholic hepatitis without ascites
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code K70.10

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the digestive system
    • Diseases of liver (K70-K77)
      • Alcoholic liver disease (K70)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Adult diagnoses Additional informationCallout TooltipAdult diagnoses
Adult. Age range is 15–124 years inclusive (e.g., senile delirium, mature cataract).

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code K70.10 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Acute alcoholic liver disease
  • Acute alcoholic liver disease
  • Acute on chronic alcoholic liver disease
  • Alcoholic hepatitis
  • Alcoholic liver damage
  • Alcoholic liver damage
  • Alcoholic liver damage
  • Chronic alcoholic hepatitis
  • Drug-induced hepatitis

Information for Patients

Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

Also called: Alcohol dependence

For most adults, moderate alcohol use is probably not harmful. However, about 18 million adult Americans have an alcohol use disorder. This means that their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse.

Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes

  • Craving - a strong need to drink
  • Loss of control - not being able to stop drinking once you've started
  • Physical dependence - withdrawal symptoms
  • Tolerance - the need to drink more alcohol to feel the same effect

With alcohol abuse, you are not physically dependent, but you still have a serious problem. The drinking may cause problems at home, work, or school. It may cause you to put yourself in dangerous situations, or lead to legal or social problems.

Another common problem is binge drinking. It is drinking about five or more drinks in two hours for men. For women, it is about four or more drinks in two hours.

Too much alcohol is dangerous. Heavy drinking can increase the risk of certain cancers. It can cause damage to the liver, brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the risk of death from car crashes, injuries, homicide, and suicide.

If you want to stop drinking, there is help. Start by talking to your health care provider. Treatment may include medicines, counseling, and support groups.

NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  • Alcohol use disorder
  • Alcohol withdrawal
  • Alcoholic ketoacidosis
  • Alcoholic liver disease
  • Alcoholic neuropathy
  • Deciding to quit drinking alcohol
  • Health risks of alcohol use
  • Helping a loved one with a drinking problem
  • When you are drinking too much - tips for cutting back

[Read More]


Also called: Viral hepatitis

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver.

Viruses cause most cases of hepatitis. The type of hepatitis is named for the virus that causes it; for example, hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Drug or alcohol use can also cause hepatitis. In other cases, your body mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the liver.

Some people who have hepatitis have no symptoms. Others may have

  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Dark-colored urine and pale bowel movements
  • Stomach pain
  • Jaundice, yellowing of skin and eyes

Some forms of hepatitis are mild, and others can be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer.

Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.

  • Autoimmune hepatitis
  • Drug-induced hepatitis
  • Hepatitis
  • Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)

[Read More]
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