ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D3A.090

Benign carcinoid tumor of the bronchus and lung

Diagnosis Code D3A.090

ICD-10: D3A.090
Short Description: Benign carcinoid tumor of the bronchus and lung
Long Description: Benign carcinoid tumor of the bronchus and lung
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D3A.090

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms
    • Benign neuroendocrine tumors (D3A)
      • Benign neuroendocrine tumors (D3A)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code D3A.090 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 209.61 - Ben carcinoid bronc/lung

Information for Patients

Benign Tumors

Also called: Benign cancer, Benign neoplasms, Noncancerous tumors

Tumors are abnormal growths in your body. They can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Benign tumors grow only in one place. They cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as your brain.

Tumors are made up of extra cells. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as your body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes, this process goes wrong. New cells form when your body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form tumor.

Treatment often involves surgery. Benign tumors usually don't grow back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Biopsy - polyps
  • Cherry angioma

[Read More]

Carcinoid Tumors

Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing cancers. They usually start in the lining of the digestive tract or in the lungs. They grow slowly and don't produce symptoms in the early stages. As a result, the average age of people diagnosed with digestive or lung carcinoids is about 60.

In later stages the tumors sometimes produce hormones that can cause carcinoid syndrome. The syndrome causes flushing of the face and upper chest, diarrhea, and trouble breathing.

Surgery is the main treatment for carcinoid tumors. If they haven't spread to other parts of the body, surgery can cure the cancer.

  • 5-HIAA
  • Carcinoid syndrome
  • Serum serotonin level

[Read More]

Lung Diseases

When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to work and grow. During a normal day, you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in the U.S. have lung disease. If all types of lung disease are lumped together, it is the number three killer in the United States.

The term lung disease refers to many disorders affecting the lungs, such as asthma, COPD, infections like influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis, lung cancer, and many other breathing problems. Some lung diseases can lead to respiratory failure.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • Alveolar abnormalities
  • Blood gases
  • Breath sounds
  • Chemical pneumonitis
  • Chest tube insertion
  • Coughing up blood
  • Lung disease
  • Lung PET scan
  • Pulmonary edema
  • Pulmonary function tests
  • Solitary pulmonary nodule

[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code D3A.09
Next Code
D3A.091 Next Code