ICD-10-CM Code P13

Birth injury to skeleton

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

P13 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of birth injury to skeleton. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:P13
Short Description:Birth injury to skeleton
Long Description:Birth injury to skeleton

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • P13.0 - Fracture of skull due to birth injury
  • P13.1 - Other birth injuries to skull
  • P13.2 - Birth injury to femur
  • P13.3 - Birth injury to other long bones
  • P13.4 - Fracture of clavicle due to birth injury
  • P13.8 - Birth injuries to other parts of skeleton
  • P13.9 - ... unspecified

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code P13:

Type 2 Excludes

Type 2 Excludes
A type 2 excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • birth injury to spine P11.5

Code Classification

  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period (P00–P96)
    • Birth trauma (P10-P15)
      • Birth injury to skeleton (P13)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Bone Diseases

Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly throughout your life. During childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about age 20, you can lose bone faster than you make bone. To have strong bones when you are young, and to prevent bone loss when you are older, you need to get enough calcium, vitamin D, and exercise. You should also avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol.

Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds of bone problems include

  • Low bone density and osteoporosis, which make your bones weak and more likely to break
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle
  • Paget's disease of bone makes them weak
  • Bones can also develop cancer and infections
  • Other bone diseases, which are caused by poor nutrition, genetics, or problems with the rate of bone growth or rebuilding

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases


[Learn More]

Childbirth Problems

While childbirth usually goes well, complications can happen. They can cause a risk to the mother, baby, or both. Possible complications include

  • Preterm (premature) labor, when labor starts before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy
  • Problems with the umbilical cord
  • Problems with the position of the baby, such as breech, in which the baby is going to come out feet first
  • Birth injuries

For some of these problems, the baby may need to be delivered surgically by a Cesarean section.


[Learn More]