ICD-10-CM Code O98.711

Human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] disease complicating pregnancy, first trimester

Version 2021 Billable Code Maternity Diagnoses Diagnoses For Females Only First Trimester (0 to 13 Weeks)

Valid for Submission

O98.711 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus [hiv] disease complicating pregnancy, first trimester. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The code O98.711 is applicable to female patients aged 12 through 55 years inclusive. It is clinically and virtually impossible to use this code on a non-female patient outside the stated age range.

ICD-10:O98.711
Short Description:Human immunodef virus disease comp preg, first trimester
Long Description:Human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] disease complicating pregnancy, first trimester

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Maternity diagnoses - The Medicare Code Editor detects inconsistencies in maternity cases by checking a patient's age and any diagnosis on the patient's record. The maternity code edits apply to patients age ange is 9–64 years inclusive (e.g., diabetes in pregnancy, antepartum pulmonary complication).
  • Diagnoses for females only - The Medicare Code Editor detects inconsistencies between a patient’s sex and any diagnosis on the patient’s record, these edits apply to FEMALES only .

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code O98.711 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 817 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURES WITH MCC
  • 818 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURES WITH CC
  • 819 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert O98.711 to ICD-9

  • 647.61 - Oth viral dis-delivered (Approximate Flag)
  • 647.63 - Oth viral dis-antepartum (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00–O99)
    • Other obstetric conditions, not elsewhere classified (O94-O9A)
      • Matern infec/parastc dis classd elsw but compl preg/chldbrth (O98)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy

If you are pregnant and have HIV/AIDS,there is a risk of passing HIV to your baby. It can happen in three ways:

  • During pregnancy
  • During childbirth, especially if it is vaginal childbirth. In some cases, your doctor may suggest doing a Cesarean section to lower the risk during childbirth.
  • During breastfeeding

You can greatly lower that risk by taking HIV/AIDS medicines. These medicines will also help protect your health. Since some medicines are not safe for babies, it is important to talk with your health care provider about which ones you should take. Then you need to make sure you take your medicines regularly.

Your baby will get HIV/AIDS medicines for 4 to 6 weeks after birth. The medicines protect your baby from infection from any HIV that passed from you during childbirth. Your baby will get several tests to check for HIV over the first few months.

Some pregnant women with HIV/AIDS may not know that they have it. So it is important that all women who are pregnant or planning to get pregnant have an HIV test as early as possible. Because most pregnant women with HIV/AIDS and their babies take HIV/AIDS medicines, few babies in the United States get HIV.

  • HIV/AIDS - pregnancy and infants (Medical Encyclopedia)

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