ICD-10 Diagnosis Code O98.413

Viral hepatitis complicating pregnancy, third trimester

Diagnosis Code O98.413

ICD-10: O98.413
Short Description: Viral hepatitis complicating pregnancy, third trimester
Long Description: Viral hepatitis complicating pregnancy, third trimester
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code O98.413

Code Classification
  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
    • Encounter for delivery (O80-O82)
      • Matern infec/parastc dis classd elsw but compl preg/chldbrth (O98)

Information for Patients


Also called: Viral hepatitis

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver.

Viruses cause most cases of hepatitis. The type of hepatitis is named for the virus that causes it; for example, hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Drug or alcohol use can also cause hepatitis. In other cases, your body mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the liver.

Some people who have hepatitis have no symptoms. Others may have

  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Dark-colored urine and pale bowel movements
  • Stomach pain
  • Jaundice, yellowing of skin and eyes

Some forms of hepatitis are mild, and others can be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer.

Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.

  • Autoimmune hepatitis
  • Drug-induced hepatitis
  • Hepatitis
  • Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)

[Read More]

Infections and Pregnancy

If you are pregnant, an infection can be more than just a problem for you. Some infections can be dangerous to your baby. You can help yourself avoid infections:

  • Don't eat raw or undercooked meat
  • Don't share food or drinks with other people
  • Wash your hands frequently
  • Don't empty cat litter. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis.

You may need to take medicines or get a vaccine to prevent an infection in your baby. For example, you may need to take antibiotics if you develop an infection with group B strep, or take medicines if you have genital herpes. Only some medicines and vaccines are safe during pregnancy. Ask your health care provider about how best to protect you and your baby.

  • Bacterial Vaginosis (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Group B streptococcal septicemia of the newborn
  • Group B streptococcus - pregnancy
  • Immunization and Pregnancy (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pregnancy and the flu
  • Pregnant Women Need a Flu Shot (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Protect Your Baby for Life: When a Pregnant Woman Has Hepatitis B (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Women (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

[Read More]
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