ICD-10 Diagnosis Code N30.41

Irradiation cystitis with hematuria

Diagnosis Code N30.41

ICD-10: N30.41
Short Description: Irradiation cystitis with hematuria
Long Description: Irradiation cystitis with hematuria
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code N30.41

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the genitourinary system
    • Other diseases of the urinary system (N30-N39)
      • Cystitis (N30)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code N30.41 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Information for Patients

Bladder Diseases

The bladder is a hollow organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Many conditions can affect your bladder. Some common ones are

  • Cystitis - inflammation of the bladder, often from an infection
  • Urinary incontinence - loss of bladder control
  • Overactive bladder - a condition in which the bladder squeezes urine out at the wrong time
  • Interstitial cystitis - a chronic problem that causes bladder pain and frequent, urgent urination
  • Bladder cancer

Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x-rays, and an examination of the bladder wall with a scope called a cystoscope. Treatment depends on the cause of the problem. It may include medicines and, in severe cases, surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Bladder biopsy
  • Bladder outlet obstruction
  • Bladder stones
  • Cystitis - noninfectious
  • Indwelling catheter care
  • Neurogenic bladder
  • Self catheterization - female
  • Self catheterization - male
  • Urinary catheters
  • Urinary Retention - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)

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Radiation Therapy

Also called: Brachytherapy, Radiotherapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from spreading. About half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including

  • The type of cancer
  • The size of the cancer
  • The cancer's location in the body
  • How close the cancer is to normal tissues that are sensitive to radiation
  • How far into the body the radiation needs to travel
  • Your general health and medical history
  • Whether you will have other types of cancer treatment
  • Other factors, such as your age and other medical conditions

Radiation therapy can damage normal cells as well as cancer cells. Treatment must be carefully planned to minimize side effects. Common side effects include skin changes and fatigue. Other side effects depend on the part of your body being treated.

Sometimes radiation is used with other treatments, like surgery or chemotherapy.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research)
  • Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do about Changes When You Urinate - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do about Feeling Sick to Your Stomach and Throwing Up (Nausea and Vomiting) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do When You Have Loose Stools (Diarrhea) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Oral mucositis
  • Radiation enteritis
  • Radiation therapy
  • Radiation therapy -- skin care
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)

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Urine and Urination

Your kidneys make urine by filtering wastes and extra water from your blood. The waste is called urea. Your blood carries it to the kidneys. From the kidneys, urine travels down two thin tubes called ureters to the bladder. The bladder stores urine until you are ready to urinate. It swells into a round shape when it is full and gets smaller when empty. If your urinary system is healthy, your bladder can hold up to 16 ounces (2 cups) of urine comfortably for 2 to 5 hours.

You may have problems with urination if you have

  • Kidney failure
  • Urinary tract infections
  • An enlarged prostate
  • Bladder control problems like incontinence, overactive bladder, or interstitial cystitis
  • A blockage that prevents you from emptying your bladder

Some conditions may also cause you to have blood or protein in your urine. If you have a urinary problem, see your healthcare provider. Urinalysis and other urine tests can help to diagnose the problem. Treatment depends on the cause.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Clean catch urine sample
  • Frequent or urgent urination
  • RBC urine test
  • Urinalysis
  • Urinary catheters
  • Urinary Retention - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Urinating more at night
  • Urination - difficulty with flow
  • Urination - painful
  • Urine - bloody
  • Urine 24-hour volume
  • Urine odor

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