ICD-10-CM Code N52.39

Other and unspecified postprocedural erectile dysfunction

Version 2020 Replaced Code Billable Code Adult Diagnoses Diagnoses For Males Only

Valid for Submission

N52.39 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other and unspecified postprocedural erectile dysfunction. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The code N52.39 is applicable to adult patients aged 15 through 124 years inclusive. It is clinically and virtually impossible to use this code on a patient outside the stated age range.

ICD-10:N52.39
Short Description:Other and unspecified postprocedural erectile dysfunction
Long Description:Other and unspecified postprocedural erectile dysfunction

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2020 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2019. This code was replaced for the FY 2020 (October 1, 2019 - September 30, 2020).

  • N52.35 - Erectile dysfunction following radiation therapy
  • N52.36 - Erectile dysfunction following interstitial seed therapy
  • N52.37 - Erectile dysfunction following prostate ablative therapy

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code N52.39 are found in the index:


Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Adult diagnoses - Adult. Age range is 15–124 years inclusive (e.g., senile delirium, mature cataract).
  • Diagnoses for males only - Medicare Code Editor detects inconsistencies between a patient’s sex and any diagnosis on the patient’s record, this code applies to MALES only .

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code N52.39 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 729 - OTHER MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITH CC/MCC
  • 730 - OTHER MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert N52.39 to ICD-9

  • 607.84 - Impotence, organic orign (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the genitourinary system (N00–N99)
    • Diseases of male genital organs (N40-N53)
      • Male erectile dysfunction (N52)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - Code Updated, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
    • New Description: Other post-surgical erectile dysfunction
    • Previous Description: Other post-surgical erectile dysfunction
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common type of male sexual dysfunction. It is when a man has trouble getting or keeping an erection. ED becomes more common as you get older. But it's not a natural part of aging.

Some people have trouble speaking with their doctors about sex. But if you have ED, you should tell your doctor. ED can be a sign of health problems. It may mean your blood vessels are clogged. It may mean you have nerve damage from diabetes. If you don't see your doctor, these problems will go untreated.

Your doctor can offer several new treatments for ED. For many men, the answer is as simple as taking a pill. Getting more exercise, losing weight, or stopping smoking may also help.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


[Learn More]