2022 ICD-10-CM Code H95.0

Recurrent cholesteatoma of postmastoidectomy cavity

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10:H95.0
Short Description:Recurrent cholesteatoma of postmastoidectomy cavity
Long Description:Recurrent cholesteatoma of postmastoidectomy cavity

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the ear and mastoid process (H60–H95)
    • Intraoperative and postprocedural complications and disorders of ear and mastoid process, not elsewhere classified (H95)
      • Intraop and postproc comp and disorders of ear/mastd, NEC (H95)

H95.0 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of recurrent cholesteatoma of postmastoidectomy cavity. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Recurrent cholesteatoma of postmastoidectomy cavity

Non-specific codes like H95.0 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for recurrent cholesteatoma of postmastoidectomy cavity:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use H95.00 for Recurrent cholesteatoma of postmastoidectomy cavity, unspecified ear
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use H95.01 for Recurrent cholesteatoma of postmastoidectomy cavity, right ear
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use H95.02 for Recurrent cholesteatoma of postmastoidectomy cavity, left ear
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use H95.03 for Recurrent cholesteatoma of postmastoidectomy cavity, bilateral ears

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code H95.0 are found in the index:

Information for Patients


Ear Infections

Ear infections are the most common reason parents bring their child to a doctor. Three out of four children will have at least one ear infection by their third birthday. Adults can also get ear infections, but they are less common.

The infection usually affects the middle ear and is called otitis media. The tubes inside the ears become clogged with fluid and mucus. This can affect hearing, because sound cannot get through all that fluid.

If your child isn't old enough to say "My ear hurts," here are a few things to look for

Your health care provider will diagnose an ear infection by looking inside the ear with an instrument called an otoscope.

Often, ear infections go away on their own. Your health care provider may recommend pain relievers. Severe infections and infections in young babies may require antibiotics.

Children who get infections often may need surgery to place small tubes inside their ears. The tubes relieve pressure in the ears so that the child can hear again.

NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)