ICD-10 Diagnosis Code K52.2

Allergic and dietetic gastroenteritis and colitis

Diagnosis Code K52.2

ICD-10: K52.2
Short Description: Allergic and dietetic gastroenteritis and colitis
Long Description: Allergic and dietetic gastroenteritis and colitis
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code K52.2

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the digestive system
    • Noninfective enteritis and colitis (K50-K52)
      • Other and unsp noninfective gastroenteritis and colitis (K52)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code K52.2 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


  • Allergic colitis
  • Allergic diarrhea
  • Allergic enteritis
  • Allergic enterocolitis
  • Allergic gastritis
  • Allergic gastritis
  • Allergic gastroenteritis
  • Allergic gastroenteritis and colitis
  • Allergic ileitis
  • Allergic jejunitis
  • Allergic sigmoiditis
  • Diarrhea in diabetes
  • Dietetic colitis
  • Dietetic diarrhea
  • Dietetic enteritis
  • Dietetic enterocolitis
  • Dietetic gastroenteritis
  • Dietetic ileitis
  • Dietetic jejunitis
  • Dietetic sigmoiditis
  • Gastrointestinal disorder due to food allergy
  • Gastrointestinal food allergy
  • Hypersensitivity gastroenteritis
  • Jejunitis
  • Jejunitis
  • Noninfectious colitis
  • Noninfectious colitis
  • Noninfectious colitis
  • Noninfectious colitis
  • Noninfectious gastroenteritis
  • Noninfectious gastroenteritis
  • Noninfectious ileitis
  • Noninfectious ileitis
  • Noninfectious sigmoiditis
  • Noninfectious sigmoiditis
  • Non-infective diarrhea
  • Non-infective diarrhea
  • Non-infective diarrhea
  • Raw-milk associated diarrhea
  • Sigmoiditis
  • Sigmoiditis

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code K52.2 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Replaced Code Additional informationCallout TooltipReplaced Code
The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2016. This codes was replaced for the FY 2017 (October 1, 2016-September 30, 2017).

This code was replaced in the 2017 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below.
  • K52.21 - Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome
  • K52.22 - Food protein-induced enteropathy
  • K52.29 - Other allergic and dietetic gastroenteritis and colitis

Information for Patients

Digestive Diseases

Also called: Gastrointestinal diseases

When you eat, your body breaks food down to a form it can use to build and nourish cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion.

Your digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube. It runs from your mouth to your anus and includes your esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. Your liver, gallbladder and pancreas are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion.

There are many types of digestive disorders. The symptoms vary widely depending on the problem. In general, you should see your doctor if you have

  • Blood in your stool
  • Changes in bowel habits
  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Heartburn not relieved by antacids

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Digestive diseases
  • EGD discharge
  • Fecal fat
  • Gastrointestinal fistula
  • Gastrointestinal perforation
  • Lower GI Series - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Stools - floating
  • Upper GI and small bowel series

[Read More]

Food Allergy

Food allergy is an abnormal response to a food triggered by your body's immune system.

In adults, the foods that most often trigger allergic reactions include fish, shellfish, peanuts, and tree nuts, such as walnuts. Problem foods for children can include eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy, and wheat.

The allergic reaction may be mild. In rare cases it can cause a severe reaction called anaphylaxis. Symptoms of food allergy include

  • Itching or swelling in your mouth
  • Vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal cramps and pain
  • Hives or eczema
  • Tightening of the throat and trouble breathing
  • Drop in blood pressure

Your health care provider may use a detailed history, elimination diet, and skin and blood tests to diagnose a food allergy.

When you have food allergies, you must be prepared to treat an accidental exposure. Wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace, and carry an auto-injector device containing epinephrine (adrenaline).

You can only prevent the symptoms of food allergy by avoiding the food. After you and your health care provider have identified the foods to which you are sensitive, you must remove them from your diet.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Allergy testing - skin
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Food allergy

[Read More]
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