ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 356.1

Peroneal muscle atrophy

Diagnosis Code 356.1

ICD-9: 356.1
Short Description: Peroneal muscle atrophy
Long Description: Peroneal muscular atrophy
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 356.1

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the nervous system
    • Disorders of the peripheral nervous system (350-359)
      • 356 Hereditary and idiopathic peripheral neuropathy

Information for Medical Professionals

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Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 356.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

Also called: Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, Peroneal muscular atrophy

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of genetic nerve disorders. It is named after the three doctors who first identified it. In the United States, CMT affects about 1 in 2,500 people.

CMT affects your peripheral nerves. Peripheral nerves carry movement and sensation signals between the brain and spinal cord and the rest of the body. Symptoms usually start around the teen years. Foot problems such as high arches or hammertoes can be early symptoms. As CMT progresses, your lower legs may weaken. Later, your hands may also become weak.

Doctors diagnose CMT by doing a neurologic exam, nerve tests, genetic tests, or a nerve biopsy. There is no cure. The disease can be so mild you don't realize you have it or severe enough to make you weak. Physical therapy, occupational therapy, braces and other devices and sometimes surgery can help.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

[Read More]

Neuromuscular Disorders

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe.

Examples of neuromuscular disorders include

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Spinal muscular atrophy

Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.

  • Apraxia
  • Hand or foot spasms
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Muscle function loss
  • Muscle twitching
  • Myotonia congenita
  • Spasticity

[Read More]

Peripheral Nerve Disorders

Also called: Neuritis, Peripheral neuritis, Peripheral neuropathy

Your peripheral nerves are the ones outside your brain and spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain and the rest of the body.

There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of other diseases, like diabetic nerve problems. Others, like Guillain-Barre syndrome, happen after a virus infection. Still others are from nerve compression, like carpal tunnel syndrome or thoracic outlet syndrome. In some cases, like complex regional pain syndrome and brachial plexus injuries, the problem begins after an injury. Some people are born with peripheral nerve disorders.

Symptoms often start gradually, and then get worse. They include

  • Numbness
  • Pain
  • Burning or tingling
  • Muscle weakness
  • Sensitivity to touch

Treatment aims to treat any underlying problem, reduce pain and control symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Axillary nerve dysfunction
  • Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction
  • Distal median nerve dysfunction
  • Femoral nerve dysfunction
  • Glossopharyngeal neuralgia
  • Metabolic neuropathies
  • Mononeuritis multiplex
  • Mononeuropathy
  • Nerve biopsy
  • Neuralgia
  • Neuropathy secondary to drugs
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Radial nerve dysfunction
  • Sensorimotor polyneuropathy
  • Tibial nerve dysfunction
  • Ulnar nerve dysfunction

[Read More]
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