ICD-9 Code 750.3

Tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia and stenosis

Not Valid for Submission

750.3 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia and stenosis. This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent.

ICD-9: 750.3
Short Description:Cong esoph fistula/atres
Long Description:Tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia and stenosis

Convert 750.3 to ICD-10

The following crosswalk between ICD-9 to ICD-10 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • Q39.0 - Atresia of esophagus without fistula
  • Q39.1 - Atresia of esophagus with tracheo-esophageal fistula
  • Q39.2 - Congenital tracheo-esophageal fistula without atresia
  • Q39.3 - Congenital stenosis and stricture of esophagus
  • Q39.4 - Esophageal web

Code Classification

  • Congenital anomalies (740–759)
    • Congenital anomalies (740-759)
      • 750 Other congenital anomalies of upper alimentary tract

Information for Medical Professionals

Synonyms

  • Congenital absence of esophagus
  • Congenital absence of esophagus with tracheoesophageal fistula
  • Congenital atresia of esophagus
  • Congenital bronchoesophageal fistula without atresia
  • Congenital esophageal ring
  • Congenital esophagobronchial fistula
  • Congenital esophagotracheal fistula
  • Congenital tracheoesophageal cleft
  • Congenital tracheoesophageal fistula with esophageal stenosis
  • Congenital web of esophagus
  • Esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula
  • Esophageal atresia, stenosis and fistula
  • Esophageal body web
  • Esophageal web
  • Esophageal web / ring
  • H-type congenital tracheoesophageal fistula
  • Imperforate esophagus
  • Lower esophageal muscular ring
  • Lower esophageal ring
  • Terminal esophageal web
  • Upper esophageal web

Index to Diseases and Injuries

References found for the code 750.3 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Esophagus Disorders

The esophagus is the tube that carries food, liquids and saliva from your mouth to the stomach. You may not be aware of your esophagus until you swallow something too large, too hot or too cold. You may also become aware of it when something is wrong.

The most common problem with the esophagus is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It happens when a band of muscle at the end of your esophagus does not close properly. This allows stomach contents to leak back, or reflux, into the esophagus and irritate it. Over time, GERD can cause damage to the esophagus. Other problems include heartburn and cancer.

Treatment depends on the problem. Some get better with over-the-counter medicines or changes in diet. Others may need prescription medicines or surgery.

  • Achalasia
  • Barrett's esophagus
  • Bleeding esophageal varices
  • Diet and eating after esophagectomy
  • Esophageal atresia
  • Esophageal manometry
  • Esophageal perforation
  • Esophageal spasm
  • Esophageal stricture - benign
  • Esophagectomy - discharge
  • Esophagitis
  • Esophagitis - infectious
  • Lower esophageal ring (Schatzki)
  • Mallory-Weiss tear
  • Swallowing problems
  • Tracheoesophageal fistula and esophageal atresia repair
  • Upper GI and small bowel series

[Read More]

Fistulas

A fistula is an abnormal connection between two parts inside of the body. Fistulas may develop between different organs, such as between the esophagus and the windpipe or the bowel and the vagina. They can also develop between two blood vessels, such as between an artery and a vein or between two arteries.

Some people are born with a fistula. Other common causes of fistulas include

  • Complications from surgery
  • Injury
  • Infection
  • Diseases, such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis

Treatment depends on the cause of the fistula, where it is, and how bad it is. Some fistulas will close on their own. In some cases, you may need antibiotics and/or surgery.

  • Fistula
  • Gastrointestinal fistula

[Read More]

Tracheal Disorders

Also called: Windpipe disorders

Your trachea, or windpipe, is one part of your airway system. Airways are pipes that carry oxygen-rich air to your lungs. They also carry carbon dioxide, a waste gas, out of your lungs.

When you inhale, air travels from your nose, through your larynx, and down your windpipe. The windpipe splits into two bronchi that enter your lungs.

Problems with the trachea include narrowing, inflammation, and some inherited conditions. You may need a procedure called a tracheostomy to help you breathe if you have swallowing problems, or have conditions that affect coughing or block your airways. You might also need a tracheostomy if you are in critical care and need to be on a breathing machine.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Acute upper airway obstruction
  • Learning about ventilators
  • Swallowing problems
  • Tracheitis
  • Tracheoesophageal fistula and esophageal atresia repair
  • Tracheomalacia - acquired
  • Tracheomalacia - congenital
  • Tracheostomy
  • Tracheostomy care
  • Tracheostomy tube - eating
  • Tracheostomy tube - speaking

[Read More]

ICD-9 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-9 and ICD-10 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Index of Diseases and Injuries Definitions

  • And - The word "and" should be interpreted to mean either "and" or "or" when it appears in a title.
  • Code also note - A "code also" note instructs that two codes may be required to fully describe a condition, but this note does not provide sequencing direction.
  • Code first - Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology. For such conditions, the ICD-10-CM has a coding convention that requires the underlying condition be sequenced first followed by the manifestation. Wherever such a combination exists, there is a "use additional code" note at the etiology code, and a "code first" note at the manifestation code. These instructional notes indicate the proper sequencing order of the codes, etiology followed by manifestation.
  • Type 1 Excludes Notes - A type 1 Excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • Type 2 Excludes Notes - A type 2 Excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • Includes Notes - This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.
  • Inclusion terms - List of terms is included under some codes. These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • NEC "Not elsewhere classifiable" - This abbreviation in the Alphabetic Index represents "other specified". When a specific code is not available for a condition, the Alphabetic Index directs the coder to the "other specified” code in the Tabular List.
  • NOS "Not otherwise specified" - This abbreviation is the equivalent of unspecified.
  • See - The "see" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index indicates that another term should be referenced. It is necessary to go to the main term referenced with the "see" note to locate the correct code.
  • See Also - A "see also" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index instructs that there is another main term that may also be referenced that may provide additional Alphabetic Index entries that may be useful. It is not necessary to follow the "see also" note when the original main term provides the necessary code.
  • 7th Characters - Certain ICD-10-CM categories have applicable 7th characters. The applicable 7th character is required for all codes within the category, or as the notes in the Tabular List instruct. The 7th character must always be the 7th character in the data field. If a code that requires a 7th character is not 6 characters, a placeholder X must be used to fill in the empty characters.
  • With - The word "with" should be interpreted to mean "associated with" or "due to" when it appears in a code title, the Alphabetic Index, or an instructional note in the Tabular List. The word "with" in the Alphabetic Index is sequenced immediately following the main term, not in alphabetical order.