ICD-9 Code 718.76

Developmental dislocation of joint, lower leg

Not Valid for Submission

718.76 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of developmental dislocation of joint, lower leg. This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent.

ICD-9: 718.76
Short Description:Dev disloc jt-lower leg
Long Description:Developmental dislocation of joint, lower leg

Convert 718.76 to ICD-10

The following crosswalk between ICD-9 to ICD-10 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • M24.80 - Oth specific joint derangements of unsp joint, NEC

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (710–739)
    • Arthropathies and related disorders (710-719)
      • 718 Other derangement of joint

Information for Medical Professionals

Information for Patients


Dislocations

Dislocations are joint injuries that force the ends of your bones out of position. The cause is often a fall or a blow, sometimes from playing a contact sport. You can dislocate your ankles, knees, shoulders, hips, elbows and jaw. You can also dislocate your finger and toe joints. Dislocated joints often are swollen, very painful and visibly out of place. You may not be able to move it.

A dislocated joint is an emergency. If you have one, seek medical attention. Treatment depends on which joint you dislocate and the severity of the injury. It might include manipulations to reposition your bones, medicine, a splint or sling, and rehabilitation. When properly repositioned, a joint will usually function and move normally again in a few weeks. Once you dislocate a shoulder or kneecap, you are more likely to dislocate it again. Wearing protective gear during sports may help prevent dislocations.

  • Dislocated shoulder - aftercare
  • Dislocation
  • Kneecap dislocation
  • Kneecap dislocation - aftercare
  • Nursemaid's elbow

[Read More]

Leg Injuries and Disorders

Your legs are made up of bones, blood vessels, muscles, and other connective tissue. They are important for motion and standing. Playing sports, running, falling, or having an accident can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures.

These injuries can affect the entire leg, or just the foot, ankle, knee, or hip. Certain diseases also lead to leg problems. For example, knee osteoarthritis, common in older people, can cause pain and limited motion. Problems in your veins in your legs can lead to varicose veins or deep vein thrombosis.

  • Blount's disease
  • Bowlegs
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction
  • Femoral nerve dysfunction
  • Femur fracture repair - discharge
  • Foot, leg, and ankle swelling
  • Iliotibial band syndrome -- aftercare
  • Ischemic ulcers -- self-care
  • Knock knees
  • Leg CT scan
  • Leg lengthening and shortening
  • Leg or foot amputation
  • Leg pain
  • Shin splints - self-care
  • Skeletal limb abnormalities
  • Tibial nerve dysfunction
  • Venous insufficiency
  • Venous ulcers -- self-care

[Read More]

ICD-9 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-9 and ICD-10 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.