ICD-9 Code 654.13

Tumors of body of uterus, antepartum condition or complication

Not Valid for Submission

654.13 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of tumors of body of uterus, antepartum condition or complication. This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent.

ICD-9: 654.13
Short Description:Uterine tumor-antepartum
Long Description:Tumors of body of uterus, antepartum condition or complication

Convert 654.13 to ICD-10

The following crosswalk between ICD-9 to ICD-10 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • O34.11 - Maternal care for benign tumor of corpus uteri, first tri
  • O34.12 - Maternal care for benign tumor of corpus uteri, second tri
  • O34.13 - Maternal care for benign tumor of corpus uteri, third tri

Code Classification

  • Complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium (630–679)
    • Normal delivery, and other indications for care in pregnancy, labor, and delivery (650-659)
      • 654 Abnormality of organs and soft tissues of pelvis

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-9 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

Information for Patients


Tumors and Pregnancy

Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. Cancer itself rarely harms the baby, and some cancer treatments are safe during pregnancy. You and your health care provider will work together to find the best treatment. Your options will depend on how far along the pregnancy is, as well as the type, size, and stage of your cancer.

Another type of tumor that women can get is called a gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD). It happens when a fertilized egg doesn't become a fetus. GTD is not always easy to find. It is usually benign, but some types can be malignant. The most common type of GTD is a molar pregnancy. In its early stages, it may look like a normal pregnancy. You should see your health care provider if you have vaginal bleeding (not menstrual bleeding).

Treatment depends on the type of tumor, whether it has spread to other places, and your overall health.

  • Choriocarcinoma
  • Gestational trophoblastic disease
  • Hydatidiform mole

[Read More]

Uterine Cancer

Also called: Endometrial cancer

The uterus, or womb, is an important female reproductive organ. It is the place where a baby grows when a women is pregnant. There are different types of uterine cancer. The most common type starts in the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. This type of cancer is sometimes called endometrial cancer.

The symptoms of uterine cancer include

  • Unusual vaginal bleeding or discharge
  • Trouble urinating
  • Pelvic pain
  • Pain during intercourse

Uterine cancer usually occurs after menopause. Being obese and taking estrogen-alone hormone replacement therapy (also called menopausal hormone therapy) also increase your risk. Treatment varies depending on your overall health, how advanced the cancer is and whether hormones affect its growth. Treatment is usually a hysterectomy, which is surgery to remove the uterus. The ovaries and fallopian tubes are also removed. Other options include hormone therapy and radiation.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Abdominal radiation - discharge
  • Choriocarcinoma
  • Endometrial biopsy
  • Endometrial cancer
  • Pelvic (between the hips) radiation - discharge
  • Radiation enteritis
  • Uterine Cancer (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Uterine sarcoma
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)

[Read More]

ICD-9 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-9 and ICD-10 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.