ICD-9 Code 250.60

Diabetes with neurological manifestations, type II or unspecified type, not stated as uncontrolled

Not Valid for Submission

250.60 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of diabetes with neurological manifestations, type ii or unspecified type, not stated as uncontrolled. This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent.

ICD-9: 250.60
Short Description:DMII neuro nt st uncntrl
Long Description:Diabetes with neurological manifestations, type II or unspecified type, not stated as uncontrolled

Convert 250.60 to ICD-10

The following crosswalk between ICD-9 to ICD-10 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • E11.40 - Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic neuropathy, unsp

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, and immunity disorders (240–279)
    • Diseases of other endocrine glands (249-259)
      • 250 Diabetes mellitus

Information for Medical Professionals

Synonyms

  • Acute painful diabetic neuropathy
  • Amyotrophy due to type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Asymmetric diabetic proximal motor neuropathy
  • Asymptomatic diabetic neuropathy
  • Chronic painful diabetic neuropathy
  • Diabetic acute painful polyneuropathy
  • Diabetic amyotrophy
  • Diabetic asymmetric polyneuropathy
  • Diabetic autonomic neuropathy
  • Diabetic autonomic neuropathy associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • Diabetic autonomic neuropathy associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Diabetic chronic painful polyneuropathy
  • Diabetic distal sensorimotor polyneuropathy
  • Diabetic femoral mononeuropathy
  • Diabetic gastroparesis
  • Diabetic gastroparesis associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • Diabetic gastroparesis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Diabetic mixed sensory-motor polyneuropathy
  • Diabetic mononeuritis multiplex
  • Diabetic mononeuropathy
  • Diabetic mononeuropathy multiplex
  • Diabetic mononeuropathy simplex
  • Diabetic motor polyneuropathy
  • Diabetic neuropathic arthropathy
  • Diabetic neuropathic arthropathy associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Diabetic neuropathy
  • Diabetic neuropathy with neurologic complication
  • Diabetic peripheral neuropathy
  • Diabetic peripheral neuropathy associated with type II diabetes mellitus
  • Diabetic polyneuropathy
  • Diabetic pseudotabes
  • Diabetic radiculopathy
  • Diabetic sensory polyneuropathy
  • Diabetic thoracic radiculopathy
  • Diabetic truncal radiculopathy
  • Mononeuropathy associated with type II diabetes mellitus
  • Myasthenic syndrome due to diabetic amyotrophy
  • Neurologic disorder associated with diabetes mellitus
  • Neurologic disorder associated with type II diabetes mellitus
  • Neurological disorder associated with malnutrition-related diabetes mellitus
  • Polyneuropathy associated with type I diabetes mellitus
  • Polyneuropathy associated with type II diabetes mellitus
  • Symmetric diabetic proximal motor neuropathy
  • Type II diabetes mellitus with neuropathic arthropathy

Information for Patients


Diabetes

Also called: DM, Diabetes mellitus

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes.

Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes.

A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your glucose level and take medicine if prescribed.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • A1C test
  • Blood sugar test - blood
  • Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Diabetes Education Program)
  • Diabetes
  • Diabetes - keeping active
  • Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care
  • Diabetes - tests and checkups
  • Diabetes - when you are sick
  • Diabetes and exercise
  • Giving an insulin injection
  • Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant
  • High blood sugar
  • Immunizations - diabetes
  • Long term complications of diabetes
  • Preparing for surgery when you have diabetes

[Read More]

Diabetes Type 2

Also called: Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth.

You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes.

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include

  • Being very thirsty
  • Urinating often
  • Feeling very hungry or tired
  • Losing weight without trying
  • Having sores that heal slowly
  • Having blurry eyesight

A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • A1C test
  • Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Diabetes Education Program)
  • Diabetes type 2 - meal planning
  • Giving an insulin injection
  • High blood sugar
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Type 2 diabetes - self-care

[Read More]

Diabetic Nerve Problems

Also called: Diabetic neuropathy

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can damage the covering on your nerves or the blood vessels that bring oxygen to your nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending messages, or may send messages slowly or at the wrong times.

This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. Symptoms may include

  • Numbness in your hands, legs, or feet
  • Shooting pains, burning, or tingling
  • Nausea, vomiting, constipation, or diarrhea
  • Problems with sexual function
  • Urinary problems
  • Dizziness when you change positions quickly

Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling your blood sugar can help prevent nerve problems, or keep them from getting worse. Treatment may include pain relief and other medicines.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type
  • Diabetes and nerve damage
  • Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care

[Read More]

ICD-9 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-9 and ICD-10 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.