ICD-9 Code 202.53

Letterer-siwe disease, intra-abdominal lymph nodes

Not Valid for Submission

202.53 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of letterer-siwe disease, intra-abdominal lymph nodes. This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent.

ICD-9: 202.53
Short Description:Letterer-siwe dis abdom
Long Description:Letterer-siwe disease, intra-abdominal lymph nodes

Convert 202.53 to ICD-10

The following crosswalk between ICD-9 to ICD-10 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • C96.0 - Multifocal and multisystemic Langerhans-cell histiocytosis

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (140–239)
    • Malignant neoplasm of lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue (200-208)
      • 202 Other malignant neoplasm of lymphoid and histiocytic tissue

Information for Medical Professionals

Information for Patients


Autoimmune Diseases

Your body's immune system protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body.

No one is sure what causes autoimmune diseases. They do tend to run in families. Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases.

There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if you really have one of these diseases, and if so, which one. Getting a diagnosis can be frustrating and stressful. Often, the first symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches and a low fever. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain and swelling.

The diseases may also have flare-ups, when they get worse, and remissions, when symptoms get better or disappear. Treatment depends on the disease, but in most cases one important goal is to reduce inflammation. Sometimes doctors prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs that reduce your immune response.

  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Complement

[Read More]

Interstitial Lung Diseases

Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to get enough oxygen. The scarring is called pulmonary fibrosis.

Breathing in dust or other particles in the air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include

  • Black lung disease among coal miners, from inhaling coal dust
  • Farmer's lung, from inhaling farm dust
  • Asbestosis, from inhaling asbestos fibers
  • Siderosis, from inhaling iron from mines or welding fumes
  • Silicosis, from inhaling silica dust

Other causes include autoimmune diseases or occupational exposures to molds, gases, or fumes. Some types of interstitial lung disease have no known cause.

Treatment depends on the type of exposure and the stage of the disease. It may involve medicines, oxygen therapy, or a lung transplant in severe cases.

  • Byssinosis
  • Caplan syndrome
  • Coal worker's pneumoconiosis
  • Histiocytosis
  • Hypersensitivity pneumonitis
  • Industrial bronchitis
  • Interstitial lung disease
  • Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge
  • Pulmonary function tests
  • Silicosis

[Read More]

Lymphatic Diseases

The lymphatic system is a network of tissues and organs. It is made up of

  • Lymph - a fluid that contains white blood cells that defend against germs
  • Lymph vessels - vessels that carry lymph throughout your body. They are different from blood vessels.
  • Lymph nodes - glands found throughout the lymph vessels. Along with your spleen, these nodes are where white blood cells fight infection.

Your bone marrow and thymus produce the cells in lymph. They are part of the system, too.

The lymphatic system clears away infection and keeps your body fluids in balance. If it's not working properly, fluid builds in your tissues and causes swelling, called lymphedema. Other lymphatic system problems can include infections, blockage, and cancer.

  • Cancer and lymph nodes
  • Cystic hygroma
  • Groin lump
  • Lymph node biopsy
  • Lymph system
  • Lymphadenitis
  • Lymphangiogram
  • Lymphangitis
  • Lymphofollicular hyperplasia
  • Neck dissection
  • Neck lump
  • Swollen glands

[Read More]

ICD-9 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-9 and ICD-10 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.