ICD-9 Code 013.52

Tuberculous abscess of spinal cord, bacteriological or histological examination unknown (at present)

Not Valid for Submission

013.52 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of tuberculous abscess of spinal cord, bacteriological or histological examination unknown (at present). This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent.

ICD-9: 013.52
Short Description:TB sp crd absc-exam unkn
Long Description:Tuberculous abscess of spinal cord, bacteriological or histological examination unknown (at present)

Convert 013.52 to ICD-10

The following crosswalk between ICD-9 to ICD-10 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • A17.81 - Tuberculoma of brain and spinal cord

Code Classification

  • Infectious and parasitic diseases (001–139)
    • Tuberculosis (010-018)
      • 013 Tuberculosis of meninges and central nervous system

Information for Medical Professionals

Information for Patients


Abscess

An abscess is a pocket of pus. You can get an abscess almost anywhere in your body. When an area of your body becomes infected, your body's immune system tries to fight the infection. White blood cells go to the infected area, collect within the damaged tissue, and cause inflammation. During this process, pus forms. Pus is a mixture of living and dead white blood cells, germs, and dead tissue.

Bacteria, viruses, parasites and swallowed objects can all lead to abscesses. Skin abscesses are easy to detect. They are red, raised and painful. Abscesses inside your body may not be obvious and can damage organs, including the brain, lungs and others. Treatments include drainage and antibiotics.

  • Abscess
  • Abscess scan - radioactive
  • Amebic liver abscess
  • Anorectal abscess
  • Bartholin's abscess
  • Brain abscess
  • Epidural abscess
  • Intra-abdominal abscess
  • Pancreatic abscess
  • Perirenal abscess
  • Peritonsillar abscess
  • Pilonidal cyst resection
  • Pyogenic liver abscess
  • Retropharyngeal abscess
  • Skin abscess
  • Subareolar abscess
  • Tooth abscess

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Spinal Cord Diseases

Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back and forth between your body and your brain. It is protected by your vertebrae, which are the bone disks that make up your spine. If you have an accident that damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include

  • Tumors
  • Infections such as meningitis and polio
  • Inflammatory diseases
  • Autoimmune diseases
  • Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy

Symptoms vary but might include pain, numbness, loss of sensation and muscle weakness. These symptoms can occur around the spinal cord, and also in other areas such as your arms and legs. Treatments often include medicines and surgery.

  • Epidural abscess
  • Spinal cord abscess
  • Spinal tumor
  • Subacute combined degeneration
  • Syphilitic myelopathy

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Tuberculosis

Also called: TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body.

TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, or talks. If you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.

Symptoms of TB in the lungs may include

  • A bad cough that lasts 3 weeks or longer
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Coughing up blood or mucus
  • Weakness or fatigue
  • Fever
  • Night sweats

Skin tests, blood tests, x-rays, and other tests can tell if you have TB. If not treated properly, TB can be deadly. You can usually cure active TB by taking several medicines for a long period of time.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Acid-fast stain
  • Coughing up blood
  • Disseminated tuberculosis
  • Meningitis - tuberculous
  • Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB) (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Mycobacterial culture
  • PPD skin test
  • Pulmonary tuberculosis
  • Routine sputum culture
  • Scrofula
  • Taking medicines to treat tuberculosis
  • Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis: General Information (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

[Read More]

ICD-9 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-9 and ICD-10 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.