Malabsorption

"Malabsorption" References in the ICD-10-CM Index to Diseases and Injuries

References in the ICD-10-CM Index to Diseases and Injuries applicable to the clinical term "malabsorption"

  • Malabsorption - K90.9 Intestinal malabsorption, unspecified
    • calcium - K90.89 Other intestinal malabsorption
    • carbohydrate - K90.49 Malabsorption due to intolerance, not elsewhere classified
    • disaccharide - E73.9 Lactose intolerance, unspecified
    • fat - K90.49 Malabsorption due to intolerance, not elsewhere classified
    • galactose - E74.20 Disorders of galactose metabolism, unspecified
    • glucose (-galactose) - E74.39 Other disorders of intestinal carbohydrate absorption
    • intestinal - K90.9 Intestinal malabsorption, unspecified
      • specified NEC - K90.89 Other intestinal malabsorption
    • isomaltose - E74.31 Sucrase-isomaltase deficiency
    • lactose - E73.9 Lactose intolerance, unspecified
    • methionine - E72.19 Other disorders of sulfur-bearing amino-acid metabolism
    • monosaccharide - E74.39 Other disorders of intestinal carbohydrate absorption
    • postgastrectomy - K91.2 Postsurgical malabsorption, not elsewhere classified
    • postsurgical - K91.2 Postsurgical malabsorption, not elsewhere classified
    • protein - K90.49 Malabsorption due to intolerance, not elsewhere classified
    • starch - K90.49 Malabsorption due to intolerance, not elsewhere classified
    • sucrose - E74.39 Other disorders of intestinal carbohydrate absorption
    • syndrome - K90.9 Intestinal malabsorption, unspecified
      • postsurgical - K91.2 Postsurgical malabsorption, not elsewhere classified

Applicable Clinical Terms Definitions

Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.

Carbohydrates: A class of organic compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a ratio of Cn(H2O)n. The largest class of organic compounds, including STARCH; GLYCOGEN; CELLULOSE; POLYSACCHARIDES; and simple MONOSACCHARIDES.

Galactose: An aldohexose that occurs naturally in the D-form in lactose, cerebrosides, gangliosides, and mucoproteins. Deficiency of galactosyl-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALACTOSE-1-PHOSPHATE URIDYL-TRANSFERASE DEFICIENCY DISEASE) causes an error in galactose metabolism called GALACTOSEMIA, resulting in elevations of galactose in the blood.

Isomaltose: A disaccharide consisting of two glucose units in an alpha (1-6) glycosidic linkage.

Lactose: A disaccharide of GLUCOSE and GALACTOSE in human and cow milk. It is used in pharmacy for tablets, in medicine as a nutrient, and in industry.

Methionine: A sulfur-containing essential L-amino acid that is important in many body functions.

Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.

Sucrose: A nonreducing disaccharide composed of GLUCOSE and FRUCTOSE linked via their anomeric carbons. It is obtained commercially from SUGARCANE, sugar beet (BETA VULGARIS), and other plants and used extensively as a food and a sweetener.

Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.