ICD-10 Code T40.7X3

Poisoning by cannabis (derivatives), assault

Version 2019 Replaced Code Non-Billable Code Poisoning Assault

Not Valid for Submission

T40.7X3 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of poisoning by cannabis (derivatives), assault. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: T40.7X3
Short Description:Poisoning by cannabis (derivatives), assault
Long Description:Poisoning by cannabis (derivatives), assault

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • T40.7X3A - Poisoning by cannabis (derivatives), assault, initial encounter
  • T40.7X3D - Poisoning by cannabis (derivatives), assault, subsequent encounter
  • T40.7X3S - Poisoning by cannabis (derivatives), assault, sequela

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2020 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2019. This code was replaced for the FY 2020 (October 1, 2019 - September 30, 2020).

  • K59.03 - Drug induced constipation

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Poisoning by, adverse effect of and underdosing of drugs, medicaments and biological substances (T36-T50)
      • Narcotics and psychodysleptics (T40)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Medical Professionals

Table of Drugs and Chemicals

The code T40.7X3 is included in the Table of Drugs and Chemicals, this table contains a classification of drugs, industrial solvents, corrosive gases, noxious plants, pesticides, and other toxic agents. Each substance in the table is assigned a code according to the poisoning classification and external causes of adverse effects. Use as many codes as necessary to describe all reported drugs, medicinal or chemical substances.

Substance Poisoning
Accidental
(unintentional)
Poisoning
Accidental
self-harm
Poisoning
Assault
Poisoning
Undetermined
Adverse
effect
Underdosing
Afghanistan blackT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
BhangT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
CannabinolT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
Cannabis (derivatives)T40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
DronabinolT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
GanjaT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
HashishT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
IndianT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
Indian
  »hemp
T40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
Indian
  »tobacco
T40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
Lebanese redT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
MarihuanaT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
MarijuanaT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
NabiloneT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
PotT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
TetrahydrocannabinolT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6
THCT40.7X1T40.7X2T40.7X3T40.7X4T40.7X5T40.7X6

Information for Patients


Marijuana

What is marijuana?

Marijuana is a green, brown, or gray mix of dried, crumbled parts from the marijuana plant. The plant contains chemicals which act on your brain and can change your mood or consciousness.

How do people use marijuana?

There are many different ways that people use marijuana, including

  • Rolling it up and smoking it like a cigarette or cigar
  • Smoking it in a pipe
  • Mixing it in food and eating it
  • Brewing it as a tea
  • Smoking oils from the plant ("dabbing")
  • Using electronic vaporizers ("vaping")

What are the effects of marijuana?

Marijuana can cause both short-term and long-term effects.

Short term:

While you are high, you may experience

  • Altered senses, such as seeing brighter colors
  • Altered sense of time, such as minutes seeming like hours
  • Changes in mood
  • Problems with body movement
  • Trouble with thinking, problem-solving, and memory
  • Increased appetite

Long term:

In the long term, marijuana can cause health problems, such as

  • Problems with brain development. People who started using marijuana as teenagers may have trouble with thinking, memory, and learning.
  • Coughing and breathing problems, if you smoke marijuana frequently
  • Problems with child development during and after pregnancy, if a woman smokes marijuana while pregnant

Can you overdose on marijuana?

It is possible to overdose on marijuana, if you take a very high dose. Symptoms of an overdose include anxiety, panic, and a rapid heartbeat. In rare cases, an overdose can cause paranoia and hallucinations. There are no reports of people dying from using just marijuana.

Is marijuana addictive?

After using marijuana for a while, it is possible to get addicted to it. You are more likely to become addicted if you use marijuana every day or you started using it when you were a teenager. If you are addicted, you will have a strong need to take the drug. You may also need to smoke more and more of it to get the same high. When you try to quit, you may have mild withdrawal symptoms such as

  • Irritability
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Decreased appetite
  • Anxiety
  • Cravings

What is medical marijuana?

The marijuana plant has chemicals that can help with some health problems. More states are making it legal to use the plant as medicine for certain medical conditions. But there isn't enough research to show that the whole plant works to treat or cure these conditions. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved the marijuana plant as a medicine. Marijuana is still illegal at the national level.

However, there have been scientific studies of cannabinoids, the chemicals in marijuana. The two main cannabinoids that are of medical interest are THC and CBD. The FDA has approved two drugs that contain THC. These drugs treat nausea caused by chemotherapy and increase appetite in patients who have severe weight loss from AIDS. There is also a liquid drug that contains CBD. It treats two forms of severe childhood epilepsy. Scientists are doing more research with marijuana and its ingredients to treat many diseases and conditions.

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse


[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.